Dyslexia Series-Disabled Legend Lindsay Wagner

Lindsay Jean Wagner was born on 22 June, 1949. Lindsay is an Emmy Award winning American actress, best known for her role as Jaime Sommers in the 1970s TV series The Bionic Woman.

Lindsay Wagner was born in Los Angeles, California. When she was 7 years old, her parents divorced and her mother moved with her to the northeast Los Angeles neighborhood of Eagle Rock, near Pasadena. Lindsay might have been able to begin her acting career as a teenager when she was offered a lead role in a TV series at age 13, but was advised by family friend James Best to wait until she was older.

Another move with her mother and stepfather (Ted Ball) brought her to Portland, Oregon, where she attended David Douglas High School and appeared in a number of school plays. Lindsay studied at the University of Oregon, overcoming dyslexia to become a successful student.

Lindsay worked as a model in Los Angeles, and gained some television experience by appearing as a hostess in Playboy After Dark. However, it was not until she contacted a friend at Universal Studios and was cast in a small part in Marcus Welby, M.D. that her acting career took off. Lindsay’s appearances helped her win roles in the films Two People and The Paper Chase. Lindsay played a total of 4 different roles on the Marcus Welby, M.D. series between 1971-75, as well as a recurring guest role in The Rockford Files.

In 1975, Lindsay then played Jaime Sommers, a former tennis pro who was the childhood sweetheart of Six Million Dollar Man, Steve Austin (played by Lee Majors). In a two-part episode entitled “The Bionic Woman”, Jaime was critically injured in a skydiving accident and, at Steve’s request, she was equipped with bionic limbs similar to his own (with the exception of his bionic eye, as Jaime was equipped with a bionic ear instead). Unfortunately, Jaime’s body rejected her new bionics and she later died.

This was intended to be Lindsay’s last role under her Universal contract, but public response to the character was so overwhelming that Jaime was “brought back to life” with her own spin-off series, The Bionic Woman (it was discovered that Jaime hadn’t really died but had been put into cryogenic suspension until she could be cured). Like Steve, Jaime became an agent for the U.S. Government agency, the O.S.I., though, suffering from amnesia, she could not remember her love for Steve. However, the two would team up for several crossover episodes thoughout the series’ run. The role earned Lindsay an Emmy Award for “Best Actress in a Dramatic Role” in 1977.

Following the cancellation of The Bionic Woman in 1978, Lindsay continued to act, predominantly in television mini-series and made-for-TV movies. These included the highly rated 1980 mini-series Scruples, as well as three made-for-TV Bionic reunion movies with Lee Majors between 1987 and 1994. Also in the 1980s, Lindsay starred in two more weekly television series; Jessie (1984) and A Peaceable Kingdom (1989), though both of these were short-lived.

Lindsay continues to act to this day[when?], though in less prominent roles. Lindsay’s most recent projects have included the 2005 telemovie, Thicker than Water, with Melissa Gilbert, Buckaroo: The Movie (2005), and, Four Extraordinary Women (2006).

In 1987, Lindsay wrote a series of books with Robert M. Klein about using acupressure to achieve results akin to a surgical facelift.

Lindsay was the spokesperson for Ford Motor Company.

Lindsay also appears in infomercials for Select Comfort’s Sleep Number bed.

More recently, Lindsay has given seminars and workshops for her self-help therapy, “Quiet the Mind & Open the Heart”, which promotes spirituality and meditation.

Lindsay has been married 4 times. From 1971–73, she was married to music publisher Allan Rider. From late 1976–79, she was married to the actor Michael Brandon. In 1981, she married stuntman Henry Kingi whom she met on the set of The Bionic Woman. Wagner had 2 sons with Kingi; Dorian born in 1982 and Alex born in 1986. Lindsay married TV producer Lawrence Mortorff in 1990, but they divorced a couple of years later.

Lindsay is related to Dallas star Linda Gray, as Linda’s ex-husband Ed Thrasher, is one of Lindsay’s uncles. Lindsay and Linda also played romantic rivals in the television movie The Two Worlds of Jenny Logan (1979), a project which was purchased for distribution in Japan and Europe only after the addition of a semi-nude scene (the only part of Lindsay’s career she openly regrets).

In 1979 Lindsay held a ticket to American Airlines Flight 191, but due to an uneasy feeling about the flight, decided to cancel. The flight went down 30 seconds after takeoff, killing all onboard.

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Dyslexia Series-Disabled Legend Greg Louganis

Gregory (“Greg”) Efthimios Louganis was born on 29 January, 1960 in El Cajon, California, USA. Greg is an American diver, who is best known for winning back-to-back Olympic titles in both the 3m and 10m diving events. Greg received the James E. Sullivan Award from the Amateur Athletic Union (AAU) in 1984 as the most outstanding amateur athlete in the United States. Greg is of Samoan/Swedish descent and was raised in California by his adoptive parents, a Greek-American couple.

At age 16, he took part in the 1976 Summer Olympics in Montreal, where he placed second in the tower event, behind Italian Klaus Dibiasi. Two years later, with Dibiasi retired, Greg went on to win his first world title in the same event.

In 1978, he accepted a diving scholarship to the University of Miami where he studied theater, but in 1981 transferred to the University of California, Irvine, where he graduated with a Bachelor of Arts.

The rise of the Chinese to dominance in the sport is in part attributable to Greg, as the Chinese coaches filmed and studied his performances assiduously, and built their national approach to diving on the mechanics they were able to discern in his technique, and upon their communications with leading coaches such as Hobie Billingsley.

Greg was a favorite for two golds in the 1980 Summer Olympics in Moscow, but an American boycott of the games prevented him from participating.

Greg won 2 world titles in 1982, and in the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics, with record scores and leads over his opponents. Greg won gold medals in both the springboard and tower diving events.

After winning 2 more world championship titles in 1986, he repeated his 1984 feat in the 1988 Seoul Olympics, although not without difficulties. In what is considered one of the greatest feats in sporting history, Greg suffered an injury, hitting his head on the diving board during the preliminary rounds while performing a reverse 2 1/2 pike; he completed the preliminaries, despite a concussion, then went on to repeat the dive during the finals, with nearly perfect scores, earning him the gold medal. Greg’s comeback earned him the title of ABC’s Wide World of Sports Athlete of the Year for 1988.

Greg posed nude for Playgirl magazine in 1987.

In 1994, Greg announced he was gay; he took part in the 1994 Gay Games as diving announcer, and performed an exhibition of several dives to a standing-room only crowd of nearly 3,000 spectators.

In 1995, Greg’s autobiography co-written with Eric Marcus, entitled Breaking the Surface, was published. Greg revealed publicly the domestic abuse and rape he suffered from a live-in lover and that he was HIV-positive. The announcement caused some controversy because of the belief, as expressed by then-United States Olympic Committee executive director Dr. Harvey Schiller, that he should have disclosed his HIV status during the 1988 Olympic games because his diving board injury resulted in light bleeding. Greg had agonized over whether to disclose his status but was later advised by AIDS expert Dr. Anthony Fauci that the injury posed no danger of infection to fellow competitors.

Following the announcement of his HIV status, Greg was dropped by most of his corporate sponsors, with the exception of the aquatics gear manufacturer Speedo, which continued to sponsor him as of 2007.

A 1997 made-for-television movie, Breaking the Surface: The Greg Louganis Story, based on the book, starred Mario López as Greg.

In 1999, Greg’s second book, For the Life of Your Dog (co-authored by Betsy Sikora Siino) was published.

Since retiring from competitive diving, Greg has done some acting, most notably appearing in an off-Broadway production of the Paul Rudnick play Jeffrey. As a hobby, he competes at the top level of dog agility with his Jack Russell Terriers. Greg is also the former boyfriend of former E! television personality Steve Kmetko.

Greg was briefly mentioned in the 2005 hit film The Longest Yard. The character Caretaker mentioned Greg whilst explaining Crewe’s, another character, chances of winning a game of 1-on-1 Basketball with D.

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Dyslexia Series-Disabled Legend Gaston Caperton

William Gaston Caperton III was born on 21 February, 1940 in Charleston, Kanawha County, West Virginia.

Gaston was twice elected as governor of the U.S. state of West Virginia and served from 1989 until 1997. Gaston is currently the president of the College Board, which administers the nationally-recognized SAT and AP tests. Gaston is a member of the Democratic Party.

Gaston attended Episcopal High School in Alexandria, Virginia and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he was a member of Delta Kappa Epsilon.

After graduation he returned to Charleston to manage a family-owned insurance firm. Gaston’s soon became its principal owner and, under his watch, it became the tenth largest privately owned insurance brokerage firm in the nation. Gaston Caperton also owned a bank and mortgage banking firm. Gaston Caperton was elected governor in his first attempt to seek public office in 1988.

In the 1988 gubernatorial election, Gaston, initially considered a long-shot for his party’s nomination, defeated the Republican Party incumbent, Arch A. Moore, Jr. In the 1992 election, Gaston was challenged by Charlotte Pritt in the Democratic primary. Gaston won the primary and the general election, defeating the Republican candidate, West Virginia Secretary of Agriculture Cleve Benedict, and Pritt, running as a write-in candidate. Gaston was constitutionally prohibited from running for a third consecutive term in 1996.

During his first term as the state’s 31st governor, Gaston supported the passages of ethics, road-building, and education bills. Gaston raised taxes in an effort to improve West Virginia’s finances, thereby reducing debts exceeding $500 million and creating a $100 million surplus. Due to the reforms, Financial World magazine called the state the most improved in the nation. Critics accused Gaston of failing to keep a campaign promise not to raise taxes, but defenders claimed that the previous governor had misstated the condition of the state’s finances and failed to disclose the need for tax increases.

Publicly, Governor Gaston Caperton emphasized that education was his first priority. Gaston Caperton supported a school-building program that led to $800 million in investments for 58 new schools and 780 school renovations, directly benefiting two-thirds of West Virginia’s public school students. After a brief strike by the state’s public educators, Gaston raised teacher’s salaries from 49th to 31st in the nation and trained more than 19,000 educators through a statewide Center for Professional Development with the goal of putting technology to its best use in West Virginia’s classrooms. Gaston encouraged the use of computers and technology in West Virginia public schools, resulting in the West Virginia Basic Skills Computer Program, which began with kindergarten and extended through 6th grade. Gaston’s common refrain for “computers in every classroom” since has been expanded to include grades 7-12. In 1996, West Virginia’s advances in education technology gained national recognition when Gaston received the Computerworld Smithsonian Award. Award sponsors called Gaston a “visionary” who “fundamentally changed the education system in America” by using technological innovations. Information about Gaston and his work is included in the Smithsonian’s Permanent Research Collection. In January 1997, the magazine Education Week, conducted a study of the nation’s education system and held out West Virginia for the state’s use of technology in education.

As Governor, Gaston focused his efforts on economic development, modern roads and infrastructure, prisons and jails, a clean environment, health care, and government management. West Virginia’s economy improved during his eight-year tenure. Unemployment dropped from 9.8% to 6.2%, the result of creating approximately 86,000 new jobs.

Near the end of his second term, Gaston was the 1996 chair of the Democratic Governor’s Association, served on the National Governor’s Association executive committee, and was a member of the Intergovernmental Policy Advisory Committee on U.S. Trade. Gaston was chairman of the Appalachian Regional Commission, Southern Regional Education Board, and the Southern Growth Policy Board. Gaston has received numerous state and national awards and special recognition, including 6 honorary doctoral degrees.

Another product of Gaston’s tenure is the Tamarack, the Best of West Virginia. The facility is a museum, art gallery, and collection of studios for visiting artists that showcases products of West Virginia and organizes the state’s “cottage industry.” Tamarack is the center of an integrated distribution and marketing network for products by more than 1,200 West Virginia artists. The Rosen Group, publisher of Niche magazine, named Gaston the 1997 Humanitarian of the Year for creating a progressive market for the state’s cottage industry.

After completing his second term, the former governor taught at Harvard University in the spring of 1997 as a fellow at the John F. Kennedy Institute of Politics. He founded and now runs the Institute on Education and Government at Columbia University.

Gaston became President and CEO of the College Board on 1 July, 1999. The New York City based College Board is a nonprofit membership association of more than 4,200 schools, colleges and other educational institutions throughout America. Its mission, as expressed by Governor Caperton, is to prepare, inspire and connect students to college success, with a focus on excellence and equity. The College Board is best known for its SAT College admissions exam and for its Advanced Placement Program, which offers high school students access to quality, college-level course work. Since taking the helm of the College Board, Governor Caperton has sought to enhance the standing and expand the reach of these two programs and to launch a series of initiatives. As a result of one of these initiatives, AP courses became more availabile to inner city and rural students.

Gaston Caperton appears concerned about unequal educational opportunity, and he led an effort to encourage students at middle schools to go to college, particularly the least advantaged. Gaston efforts prompted USA Today to label him an “education crusader”. The publication also named him one of the most influential people in America in its feature, “People to Watch: 2001.”

More recently, Governor Caperton led a successful campaign to revise the SAT when the College Board’s trustees requested changes to the test. The College Board introduced a set of changes to the SAT that include a writing test, more critical reading, and advanced math. The goal of the new SAT I is to more closely reflect the course work of the nation’s high school students while maintaining what they describe as the test’s level of rigor and excellence. The new SAT I was administered for the first time in March 2005.

Gaston Caperton was embarrassed when his first wife, Ella Dee Caperton (born Ella Kessel, Miss West Virginia 1964) divorced him during his first term, and unsuccessfully ran in the election for state treasurer. With Dee he had 2 boys, William Gaston Caperton, IV, (“Gat”) and John Caperton. Both sons are married and living with their own families (“Gat” in West Virginia and John in California).

Gaston’s second wife was the Musical Director Conductor of the Wheeling Symphony Orchestra, Rachael Worby. Gaston is currently married to his third wife Idit Harel Caperton, an Israeli, MIT PhD, an education technology expert, a mother of 3, and the Founder and CEO of MaMaMedia.

Gaston and Idit Caperton live and work in New York City.

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Dyslexia Series-Disabled Legend Eric Wynalda

Eric Wynalda was born on 9 June, 1969 in Fullerton, California. Eric Wynalda is an American international center forward, currently playing for Bakersfield Brigade in the USL Premier Development League. Eric Wynalda scored the first goal ever in Major League Soccer in 1996 and was elected to the National Soccer Hall of Fame in 2004.

Eric Wynalda grew up in Westlake Village, California. As a child his team (the Westlake Wolves) won the state championship in AYSO soccer as Eric Wynalda scored more goals than the entire division his team played in, combined (56 goals in 16 games). Eric Wynalda later attended Westlake High School and was a 3 time All State selection with the school’s boys soccer team and a youth club team mate of fellow national team player Cobi Jones.

Eric Wynalda attended San Diego State University from 1987 to 1989 where he played for the Aztecs men’s soccer team, scoring 34 goals and assisting on 25 others during his three seasons. Eric Wynalda freshman year, SDSU went to the NCAA Men’s Soccer Championship game where it lost to the Bruce Murray led Clemson Tigers. While at SDSU, he also played two seasons with the local semi-pro San Diego Nomads of the Western Soccer Alliance. In 1988, he played a single game and in 1989, he played 5 games with the Nomads.

Leading up to the 1990 FIFA World Cup, Eric Wynalda signed a contract with the U.S. Soccer Federation (USSF). After the World Cup, Eric Wynalda signed as an on loan player from USSF with the San Francisco Bay Blackhawks of the American Professional Soccer League. During his nearly 3 seasons with the Blackhawks, he played only a handful of games with the team, devoting most of his time to the national team.

However, in 1992, he experienced a falling out with both the national team and the Blackhawks. In May 1992, national team coach Bora Milutinović kicked Eric Wynalda out of a national team training camp after he elbowed a teammate in the face. A month later, he was kicked off the Blackhawks for being disruptive, and constantly bickering with the coach, Laurie Calloway. When no U.S. based team expressed an interest in Eric Wynalda, he announced his intentions to pursue a move to Europe. In August 1992, USSF loaned Eric Wynalda to Bundesliga club Saarbrücken for $45,000.

When he arrived at Saarbrucken, he became the first American-born player to play for a top level German club. Eric Wynalda had an immediate impact on the club, scoring 8 goals in the first half of the season. This led Saarbrücken to purchase Eric Wynalda’s contract from USSF for $405,000. However, his output dropped after the winter break and he only scored once in the second half. Saarbrücken finished the 1992-1993 at the bottom of the Bundesliga standings and was relegated to the Second Division. Eric Wynalda scored twelve goals in the 1993-1994 season and was transferred to fellow Second Division club VfL Bochum at the end of the season for $850,000. Wynalda failed to equal his scoring exploits with Bochum, and experienced a falling out with the club. Eric Wynalda had a hernia operation on 30 August which put him out of action. While convalesing, he criticized the club and its coach, leading to the coach suspending Eric Wynalda.

Eric Wynalda came back to the States in 1996, signing with Major League Soccer (MLS). As part of the process of creating the new league, known players were distributed throughout the league’s new teams (except for the Dallas Burn, which alone amongst all MLS sides never received a US National Team allocation from the 1994 World Cup era). The league allocated Eric Wynalda to the San Jose Clash. On 6 April, 1996 Eric Wynalda scored the first goal in league history in its inaugural game as the Clash beat D.C. United 1-0. Eric Wynalda was named U.S. Soccer Athlete of the Year.

After the 1998 World Cup, Eric Wynalda began seeking a move back to Europe. While he had publicly declared that he would never return to Germany, including turning down a January 1998 offer from Kaiserslautern, he now began putting out feelers there. When no German teams expressed an interest in Eric Wynalda, he then sought a move to England. In December, he had a trial with Charlton Athletic, but the team did not offer Eric Wynalda a contract and Eric Wynalda returned to the Clash.

Eric Wynalda was loaned out to Club León in Mexico in 1999. Eric Wynalda tore both the ACL and medial meniscus on his left knee while with Leon which put him out of action for several months. After missing the first 11 games of the 1999 season, the Clash traded Eric Wynalda to the Miami Fusion. On 8 July, 2000, the Fusion turned around and traded Eric Wynalda to the New England Revolution for Ivan McKinley after Eric Wynalda failed to improve the Fusion’s offensive output. On 3 May, 2001, the Revs sent him to the Chicago Fire for John Wolyniec, where he finished his MLS career, ending up with a total of 34 MLS goals (plus 2 in the playoffs). In 2002, Eric Wynalda joined the Los Angeles Galaxy, announcing that he planned to retire with the team. However, he left the Galaxy during the team’s pre-season tour of Chile in order to pursue an offer to play professionally in China. When that offer fell through, he returned to the Galaxy only to leave it for the Charleston Battery of the USL First Division after feuding with the MLS front office about his salary. MLS was offering to pay Eric Wynalda $43,000 for the 2002 season which Eric Wynalda considered much too low. As the Battery had offered him $75,000, Eric Wynalda joined that team only to tear his anterier cruciate ligament in a pre-season match. Eric Wynalda elected to retire from professional soccer and became a broadcast announcer.

Eric Wynalda earned his first cap against Costa Rica on 2 February, 1990. On 14 March, 1990, he signed a contract with the United States Soccer Federation which made him a full time national team player. Later that year, Eric Wynalda played in his first World Cup gaining the dubious honor of becoming the first U.S. player to be ejected from a World Cup game. That came when Czechoslovakian midfielder Lubomir Moravcik baited Eric Wynalda in front of a referee. Eric Wynalda, showing his immaturity, retaliated and was shown red.

In the 1994 FIFA World Cup, Eric Wynalda scored on a free kick from 20 yards as the United States tied Switzerland. Eric Wynalda also played in Copa America 1995, where he was named to the all-tournament team after scoring against Chile and Argentina.

In 1998, Eric Wynalda participated in his third World Cup, one of four U.S. players (Tab Ramos, Tony Meola and Marcelo Balboa) to earn that honor. Claudio Reyna and Kasey Keller have since gone on to be named to a record four World Cup rosters.

Eric Wynalda retired from the US National Team as its all-time leading scorer with 34goals in 106 appearances. Eric Wynalda was the sole owner of the record until 2007, when Landon Donovan tied the record with a penalty kick goal against Mexico in the 2007 CONCACAF Gold Cup final. Eric Wynalda was named the Honda US Player of the Decade for the 1990s and elected to the National Soccer Hall of Fame in 2004.

In 2005, Bakersfield Brigade of the USL Premier Development League hired Eric Wynalda as its technical director, and in 2007 he agreed a short-term playing contract with the team during the last few matches of their season. On 1 May, 2008 he signed a formal season-long agreement to play the entire campaign with the Brigade as a full member of the 2008 playing squad.

Eric Wynalda has also continued to play with an over-30s amateur team in Los Angeles, Hollywood United, alongside former U.S. internationals Alexi Lalas and John Harkes, former French international Frank Leboeuf, former Welsh international player Vinnie Jones, and actor Anthony La Paglia. United plays in the Los Angeles Olympic Soccer League.

Eric Wynalda was a soccer analyst for ESPN. Eric Wynalda was also the in-studio analyst for 2006 FIFA World Cup on United States, English-language broadcasts. Eric Wynalda was one of the most vocal critics of USA’s head coach, Bruce Arena, in the 2006 World Cup. However, after the World Cup, he was amicably paired in-studio with Arena as co-analysts for some 2006 MLS Cup playoff games, a successful arrangement which continued with ESPN’s coverage of the US National Team in 2007. Eric Wynalda was one of the main analysts for ESPN and ABC during the 2007 Major League Soccer season.

After a number of controversies, he left ESPN prior to the 2008 season, a year before his contract was due to expire.

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Dyslexia Series-Disabled Legend Anne Bancroft

Anne Bancroft was born on 17 September, 1931 in the Bronx, New York, USA and died on 6 June, 2005 of uterine cancer at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City, New York, USA. Anne Bancroft’s death came as a surprise to even some of her friends; she was intensely private and had not released details of her illness.

Anne Bancroft was an American Academy Award-,Golden Globe-,Tony-,and Emmy-winning method actress.

Anne Bancroft was born Anna Maria Louisa Italiano,the daughter of Mildred (née DiNapoli), a telephone operator, and Michael Italiano, a dress pattern maker. Anne Bancroft’s parents were both children of Italian immigrants.

Anne Bancroft graduated from Christopher Columbus High School in the Bronx in 1948, and attended the American Academy of Dramatic Arts, the Actors Studio, and the American Film Institute’s Directing Workshop for Women at UCLA. After appearing in a number of live television dramas under the name Anne Marno, she was told to change her surname for her film debut in Don’t Bother to Knock in 1952.

Anne Bancroft was a contract player in the early days of her career just as the studio contract system was ending. Anne Bancroft left Hollywood and returned to New York due to the quality of roles she was being offered.

In 1958 she appeared opposite Henry Fonda in the Broadway production of Two for the Seesaw, for which she won a Tony Award, and another in 1962 for The Miracle Worker. Anne Bancroft took the latter role back to Hollywood, and won the Academy Award for Best Actress in 1962.

A highly acclaimed television special, “Annie: the Women in the Life of a Man” won her an Emmy award for her singing and acting. Anne Bancroft is one of a very select few entertainers to win an Oscar, an Emmy and a Tony award.

Anne Bancroft as Mother Miriam Ruth in Agnes of God Other major film roles were in The Pumpkin Eater, 7 Women, and what is unquestionably her best-known role, Mrs. Robinson, opposite Dustin Hoffman in the film The Graduate. Ironically, Anne Bancroft, then only 36 years old, played opposite a 30-year-old Hoffman. Although Anne Bancroft is now iconically identified as Mrs. Robinson, she was not the first choice for the role; Patricia Neal(who had recently suffered a stroke), Doris Day and Jeanne Moreau turned it down. Anne Bancroft was ambivalent about her appearance in The Graduate; she stated in several interviews that the role overshadowed all of her other work.

In 1980, she made her debut as a screenwriter and director in Fatso, in which she starred along with Dom DeLuise. Anne Bancroft was also the original choice to play Joan Crawford in the 1981 movie Mommie Dearest, but backed out at the 11th hour, and was replaced by Faye Dunaway. Anne Bancroft was also a front-runner for the role of Aurora Greenway in Terms of Endearment, but declined in order to act in the remake of To Be or Not to Be (1983).

From 1 July, 1953, to 13 February, 1957, she was married to Martin May. The marriage produced no children.

In 1961, Anne Bancroft met Mel Brooks in a rehearsal for the Perry Como variety show. Mel Brooks bribed a studio employee to find out where she was having dinner so he could meet her again. Once Anne Bancroft met Mel Brooks, she went to her therapist and told him they had to conclude the therapy as fast as possible because she had met the man she was going to marry.

They married on 5 August, 1964, in New York City Hall and were together until her death. They had one son, Maximillian, in 1972. They were seen 3 times on the screen together: once dancing a tango in Brooks’s 1976 Silent Movie, in Brooks’s 1983 remake of To Be or Not to Be, and in the episode entitled “Opening Night” of the HBO show Curb Your Enthusiasm. Mel Brooks produced the 1980 film The Elephant Man, in which Anne Bancroft acted. Mel Brooks also executive-produced the 1987 film 84 Charing Cross Road in which she starred. Anne Bancroft is on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 6368 Hollywood Boulevard.

Anne Bancroft was survived by Mel Brooks, their son, a grandson, her mother and 2 sisters. Anne Bancroft is interred at the Kensico Cemetery in Valhalla, New York, near her father, Michael Italiano. A white marble monument with a weeping angel adorns her grave.

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Dyslexia Series-Disabled Legend James Duke

James Henry “Red” Duke, Jr. was born in 1928. James is a trauma surgeon and professor at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. James has been working on-site since 1972.

James Duke attended Texas A&M University in College Station, Texas where he served as a yell leader. James Duke was the first person to deliver the poem “The Last Corps Trip” publicly.

James Duke has had years of achievement in the field of medicine. James Duke was instrumental in introducing Memorial Hermann’s “Life Flight” and bringing a Level 1 Trauma Unit to Houston, Texas, both of which was first for Texas and Southeast Texas, respectively. Outside of Texas, he is probably most famous for running a nationally syndicated television spot called “Dr. James Duke’s Health Reports”, which aired for 15 years.

The spot educated millions about various health-related topics, a different subject for each day. James Duke well-recognized for his distinctive Southern accent, ever-present large mustache and “Duke-isms” (like his popular segment sign-off “For your health!”).

James Duke was also the surgeon that attended to the wounds of Texas Governor John Connally, who was shot at the same time John F. Kennedy was assassinated in 1963.

Recently, the University of Texas Medical School at Houston Department of Surgery sponsored a scholarship fund in honor of Dr. “Red” Duke, aimed towards students wishing to research and train in the field of trauma.

James Duke is also noted outside of the medical community. Not only did he attain the rank of Eagle Scout, but the Boy Scouts of America honored him with the Distinguished Eagle Scout Award.

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