The End of Club Feet or Foot Series

I hope you have enjoyed reading about “What Is Club Foot or Feet Series” and of the Famous People that have or had suffered from Club Feet or Foot.

Sadly, we have come to the end of our “Club Feet or Foot Series”. We now begin our “Schizophrenia Series” so please enjoy reading.

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The End Of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) Series

I hope you have enjoyed reading about “What Is Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis? (ALS) Series” and of the Famous People that have or had suffered from (ALS)Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

Sadly, we have come to the end of our “Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Series”. We now begin our “Club Feet or Foot Series” so please enjoy reading.

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Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) Series-Disabled Legend Dennis Day

Dennis Day was born on 21 May, 1916 in New York City, New York, USA and died on 22 June, 1988 of Lou Gehrig’s disease at the age of 72 in Los Angeles, California, USA. Dennis Day is interred at Holy Cross Cemetery. Dennis Day’s star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame is at 6646 Hollywood Boulevard.

Born Owen Patrick Eugene McNulty, was an Irish-American singer, radio and television personality.

Dennis Day was born and raised in New York City, the son of Irish immigrants. Dennis Day’s father was a stationary engineer. Dennis Day graduated from St. Patrick’s Cathedral High School, and attended Manhattan College, where he sang in the glee club.

Dennis Day appeared for the 1st time on Jack Benny’s radio show on 8 October, 1939, taking the place of another famed tenor, Kenny Baker. Dennis Day remained associated with Benny’s radio and television programs until Benny’s death in 1974. Dennis Day was introduced (with actress Verna Felton playing his mother) as a young (19 year old), naive boy singer — a character he kept through his whole career. Dennis Day’s
1st song was “Goodnight My Beautiful”.

Besides singing, Dennis Day was an excellent mimic. Dennis Day did many imitations on the Benny programme of various noted celebrities of the era, such as Ronald Colman, Jimmy Durante, and Jimmy Stewart.

Sam Berman’s caricature of Dennis Day for 1947 NBC promotional bookFrom 1944 through 1946, he served in the US Navy as a Lieutenant. On his return to civilian life, he continued to work with Benny while also starring his own show, A Day in the Life of Dennis Day (1946-1952). Dennis Day’s having 2 programmes in comparison to Benny’s 1was the subject of numerous jokes and gags on Benny’s show, usually revolving around Dennis Day rubbing Benny’s, and sometimes other cast members and guest stars’ noses in that fact.

Dennis Day’s TV series, The Dennis Day Show (aka The RCA Victor Show) was telecast from 1952 to 1954. Between 1952 and 1978, he made numerous TV appearances as a singer, actor and voice for animation (such as the Walt Disney feature Melody Time, voicing multiple characters).

In 1948,Dennis Day married Peggy Almquist; the marriage lasted until his death in 1988. The couple had 10 children. 1 of his brothers was wed to actress/singer Ann Blyth.

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Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) Series-Disabled Legend Jacob Javits

Jacob Koppel “Jack” Javits was born on 18 May, 1904 and died on 7 March, 1986. Jacob was an American politician who served as United States Senator from New York from 1957 to 1981. A liberal Republican, he was originally allied with Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller, fellow U.S. Senators Irving Ives and Kenneth Keating, and New York City Mayor John V. Lindsay.

Jacob Javits graduated from New York University and its law school in Manhattan. Jacob was admitted to the bar in 1927. During World War II, he was a lieutenant colonel in the United States Army.

Jacob was initially elected to New York’s 21st congressional district (since redistricted) in the United States House of Representatives during the heavily Republican year of 1946. Jacob was a member of the freshman class along with John F. Kennedy of Massachusetts and Richard M. Nixon of California. Jacob served from 1947 to 1954, then resigned his seat after his election as the New York Attorney General.

In 1956, he defeated Mayor of New York City Robert F. Wagner, Jr., in a U.S. Senate race to succeed the retiring incumbent Democratic Senator Herbert Lehman. Like Lehman, Jacob Javits was for a time the only Jew in the U.S. Senate.

A graduate of the New York University School of Law, Jacob Javits was generally considered a liberal Republican, and was supportive of labour unions and movements for civil rights. In 1964, Jacob Javits refused to support his party’s presidential nominee, his conservative colleague, Barry M. Goldwater of Arizona even though Barry Goldwater had said in 1962 that he would vote to re-elect Jacob Javits were Barry Goldwater a New York voter.

Senator Javits sponsored the 1st African-American Senate page in 1965 and the 1st female page in 1971. Jacob’s background, coupled with his liberal stands, enabled him to win the votes of many historically Democratic voters. Jacob was highly successful in all elections in which he was a candidate from 1946 to 1974.

Jacob Javits played a major role in legislation protecting pensioners, as well as in the passage of the War Powers Act; he led the effort to get the Javits-Wagner-O’Day Act passed. Jacob reached the position of Ranking Minority Member on the Committee on Foreign Relations while accruing greater seniority than any New York Senator before or since (as of 2007). Jacob was also one of the main forces behind the 1965 Immigration and Nationality Act that by removing immigration quota that favoured Western European nations helped to make the U.S. a truly diverse and multicultural country.

Jacob Javits served until 1981; his 1979 diagnosis with amytrophic lateral sclerosis (also known as Lou Gehrig’s Disease) led to a 1980 primary challenge by the comparatively lesser-known Long Island Republican county official Alfonse D’Amato. Alfonse D’Amato received 323,468 primary votes (55.7 percent) to Jacob Javits’ 257,433 (44.3 percent). Jacob Javits’ loss to Alfonse D’Amato stemmed from Jacob Javits’ continuing illness and his failure to adjust politically to the rightward movement of the GOP.

Following the primary defeat, Jacob Javits ran as the Liberal Party candidate in the general election, having split the Democratic base vote with United States Representative Elizabeth Holtzman of Brooklyn and giving Alfonse D’Amato a plurality victory.

Jacob Javits died of Lou Gehrig’s disease in West Palm Beach, Florida, at the age of 81. In addition to Marian, he was survived by 3 children, Joshua, Carla, and Joy.

Among those who attended the funeral were Governor Mario Cuomo, Mayor Ed Koch, former President Richard Nixon, Attorney General Edwin Meese, former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger, Senator D’Amato, John Cardinal O’Connor, former Mayor Lindsay, former Governor Hugh Carey of New York, and former State Attorney General Louis Lefkowitz.

Also there were U.S. Representative Bella Abzug of Manhattan; then Senators Nancy Kassebaum Baker of Kansas, Bill Bradley of New Jersey, Lowell Weicker of Connecticut, and Gary Hart of Colorado; David Rockefeller, the banker; Arthur Ochs Sulzberger, publisher of The New York Times; Victor Gotbaum, the labour leader; Kurt Vonnegut, the writer, and Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., the actor.

Honours:

Jacob Javits received the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1983.

New York’s Javits Center is named in his honour, as is a playground at the southwestern edge of Fort Tryon Park. The Jacob K. Javits Federal Building at 26 Federal Plaza in lower Manhattan’s Civic Center district, as well as a lecture hall on the campus of the State University of New York at Stony Brook on Long Island, are also named after him.

The United States Department of Education awards a number of Javits Fellowships to support graduate students in the humanities and social sciences.

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Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) Series-Disabled Legend Hans Keller

Hans Keller was born in 1919 and died in 1985, Hans was an Austrian-born British musician and writer who made significant contributions to musicology and music criticism, and invented the method of ‘Wordless Functional Analysis’ (in which a work is analysed in musical sound alone, without any words being heard or read).

Hans Keller was born into a well-to-do and culturally well-connected Jewish family in Vienna, and as a boy was taught by the same Oskar Adler who had, decades earlier, been Arnold Schoenberg’s boyhood friend and first teacher. Hans Keller also came to know the composer and performer Franz Schmidt, but was never a formal pupil. In 1938 the Anschluss forced Hans Keller to flee to London (where he had relatives), and in the years that followed he became a prominent and influential figure in the UK’s musical and music-critical life. Initially active as a violinist and violist, he soon found his niche as a highly prolific and provocative writer on music as well as an influential teacher, lecturer, broadcaster and coach.

An original thinker never afraid of controversy, Hans Keller’s passionate support of composers whose work he saw as under-valued or insufficiently understood made him a tireless advocate of Benjamin Britten and Arnold Schoenberg as well as an illuminating analyst of figures such as Mozart, Haydn, Beethoven and Mendelssohn. Much of this advocacy was carried out from within the BBC, where he came to hold several senior positions.

Hans Keller’s gift for systematic thinking, allied to his philosophical and psycho-analytic knowledge, bore fruit in the method of ‘Wordless Functional Analysis’ (abbreviated by the football-loving Hans Keller as ‘FA’), designed to furnish incontrovertibly audible demonstrations of a masterwork’s ‘all-embracing background unity’. This method was developed in tandem with a ‘Theory of Music’ which explicitly considered musical structure from the point of view of listener expectations; the ‘meaningful contradiction’ of expected ‘background’ by unexpectable ‘foreground’ was seen as generating a work’s expressive content. An element of Hans Keller’s theory of unity was the ‘Principle of Reversed and Postponed Antecedents and Consequents’, which has not been widely adopted. Hans Keller’s term ‘homotonality’, however, has proved useful to musicologists in several fields.

Hans Keller was married to the artist Milein Cosman, whose drawings illustrated some of his work.

As a man very prominent in the world of ‘contemporary music’ (even working for several years as the BBC’s ‘Chief Assistant, New Music’), Hans Keller had close personal and professional ties with many composers, and was frequently the dedicatee of new compositions. Those who dedicated works to him include:

Benjamin Britten (String Quartet No.3, Op. 94)
Benjamin Frankel (String Quartet No.5, Op.43)
Philip Grange,
David Matthews (Piano Trio No.1; ‘To Hans Keller’)
Bayan Northcott,
Buxton Orr (Piano Trio No.1; ‘In admiration and friendship’),
Robert Simpson (Symphony No.7; ‘To Hans and Milein Keller’).
Robert Matthew-Walker (Piano Sonata No.3 – ‘Fantasy-Sonata: Hamlet’), Op.34

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Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) Series-Disabled Legend Stanley Sadie

Stanley Sadie CBE was born on 30 October, 1930 and died on 21 March, 2005 at his home in Cossington, Somerset, of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig’s disease), which had been diagnosed only a few weeks earlier.. Stanley was a leading British musicologist, music critic, and editor. Stanley was editor of the 6th edition of the Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians (1980), which was published as the 1st edition of the New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians.

Stanley was educated at St Paul’s School, London, and Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge, where he read music under Thurston Dart (BA, MusB 1953, MA 1957, PhD 1958). Stanley doctoral dissertation was on mid 18th century British chamber music. After Cambridge, he taught at Trinity College of Music, London (1957-1965).

Stanley then turned to music journalism, becoming music critic for The Times (1964-1981), and contributing reviews to the Financial Times after 1981, when he had to leave his position and The Times because of his commitments to the Grove and other scholarly work. Stanley was editor of The Musical Times 1967-1987.

From 1970 Stanley was editor of what was planned to be the 6th edition of the Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians (1980). Stanley oversaw major changes to the Dictionary, which grew from 9 volumes to 20, and was published as the New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians, and is now referred to as the 1st edition under that name. Stanley was also an important force behind the 2nd (or 7th) edition (2001), which grew further to 29 volumes. Stanley also oversaw a major expansion of the Grove franchise, editing the 1 volume Grove Concise Dictionary of Music (1988), and several spinoff dictionaries, such as the New Grove Dictionary of Musical Instruments (3 volumes, 1984), the New Grove Dictionary of American Music, (with H. Wiley Hitchcock, 4 volumes, 1986), and the New Grove Dictionary of Opera (4 volumes, 1992). Stanley also edited composer biographies based on the entries in Grove.

Outside his work on the Grove Dictionaries, Stanley was a renowned Mozart scholar, publishing several books. Stanley also was instrumental in saving the Mayfair house where George Frideric Handel once lived, turning it into the Handel House Museum.

Stanley was president of the Royal Musical Association (1989-94), and of the International Musicological Society (1992-97).

Stanley married twice. Stanley’s 1st wife, Adele, by whom he had 2 sons and a daughter, died in 1978. By his 2nd wife, Julie Anne, also a musicologist, he had a son and daughter. Stanley was survived by all 5 of his children and Julie Anne.

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Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) Series-Disabled Legend Fokko du Cloux

Fokko du Cloux was born on 20 December, 1954 and died on 10 November, 2006. Fokko du Cloux was a mathematician and computer scientist who worked on the Atlas of Lie groups and representations until his death. One of the founding members of the project, he was responsible for building the Atlas software which was instrumental in the mapping of the E8 Lie Group. The Project successfully managed to map the structure of the E8 group in 2007. Fokko du Cloux was diagnosed with Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in 2005, but he continued to actively participate in the project until his death.

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