Dementia Series-Disabled Legend Bill Quackenbush

Hubert George “Bill” Quackenbush was born on 2 March, 1922 in Toronto, Ontario and died of pneumonia on 12 September, 1999 at Chandler Hall Hospice in Newtown, Pennsylvania at the age off 77 years old. Bill was a Canadian professional ice hockey defenceman who played for the Boston Bruins and Detroit Red Wings in the National Hockey League. Bill’s career spanned 14 years (1942–56), the first 7 with Detroit and the remainder with the Bruins.

Bill was the pre-eminent offensive defenceman of his era. Bill won the Lady Byng Memorial Trophy in 1949. Bill was the first defenceman to win this award, and played the entire 1948–49 season (and a total of 138 consecutive games across 3 seasons) without recording a penalty. Bill Quackenbush was a 3 time 1st team and 2 time 2nd team All Star. Bill was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1976.

After his NHL career, he coached college hockey at Princeton University, leading the Princeton Men’s team to one of the their best seasons in 1967–68, a 13–10–1 campaign that included winning the ECAC Christmas tournament championship. Bill later led the Princeton Women’s Ice Hockey team to three consecutive Ivy League championships in 1982–84.

Defenseman Hubert “Bill” Quackenbush excelled at both offensive and defensive aspects of the game. During 14 seasons, he was among the NHL’s elite rushing blueliners. More significantly, he was a superior defender in his own end who relied on positioning and discipline rather than physical intimidation for his success. Consequently, his penalty minute totals were remarkably low considering his role on the ice.

Bill Quackenbush began gaining local attention with the OHA’s Toronto Native Sons in 1940-41 when he registered 13 points in as many games. Detroit Red Wings scout Carson Cooper noticed him the following year while he was playing with the Brantford Juniors under coach Tommy Ivan, who himself later became head coach of the Red Wings.

The young rearguard wasn’t looking out of place during a ten-game call-up with Detroit in 1942-43 until he broke his wrist. After recovering from his injury, the parent club decided it was preferable that he spend the remainder of his first pro year with the Indianapolis Capitals of the AHL. He joined the Red Wings’ defense corps permanently the following season.

By the late 1940s, he’d evolved into one of hockey’s top blueliners. 3 times Bill Quackenbush was placed on the NHL’s First All-Star Team and twice he was selected to the 2nd Team.

At the conclusion of the 1948-49 season, he became the first defenseman to win the Lady Byng Trophy. It was at this time that Bill Quackenbush was in the midst of one of the NHL’s more astounding individual achievements. Bill managed to go 131 consecutive games without drawing a penalty. The streak began with the final 5 regular-season games and 10 playoff games in 1947-48, 60 regular-season and 11 post-season matches the next year and the first 45 games in 1949-50. During this penalty-free period, Bill Quackenbush’s regular defense partner was the equally mild-mannered Red Kelly, who later became the second rearguard to win the Lady Byng.

Amazingly, he incurred only one major penalty in his entire career, and that was a dubious call based on a quick wrestling match he had with Gaye Stewart. To many observers, he was the prototype of efficiency and finesse in defensive zone coverage. Bill Quackenbush was also considered a master at diffusing any forward’s attempt to generate offense from behind his opponent’s net.

A month before training camp in 1949, Bill Quackenbush and Pete Horeck were traded to the Bruins for several players, including future Stanley Cup hero Pete Babando. Bill’s rushes with the puck helped endear him to the Beantown supporters who hadn’t seen this type of daring play from the blue line since the days of Eddie Shore.

In 1950-51, the elder Bill Quackenbush had the opportunity to play with his younger brother Max, a lanky defenseman who was 3 inches taller. Later that season, the Bruins’ blue line brigade was decimated by injury, leaving Bill Quackenbush as the only experienced player. Bill was forced to play 55 minutes in one contest, a test of his stamina and experience. Bill retired in 1956 and was elected to the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1976.

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Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Series-Disabled Legend Paul Gascoigne

Paul Gascoigne was born on 27 May 1967. Paul Gascoigne often referred to as Gazza, is a retired English football player who is widely regarded as one of the most gifted footballers of his generation. In Paul’s childhood, he often showed signs of a compulsive personality. At one stage he was so addicted to gaming machines that, having spent all his money, he stole £15 from his sister’s purse before going out and losing it. Paul also developed an early shoplifting habit, which he describes as being about the buzz, not the merchandise. Paul suffered OCD.

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Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Series-Disabled Legend Stanley Kubrick

Stanley Kubrick was born on 26 July,1928 and died on 7 March, 1999. Stanley Kubrick was an influential and acclaimed film director and producer considered among the greatest of the 20th century. Stanley’s father taught him chess at the age twelve; the game remained a life-long obsession. When Stanley was 13 years old, Jacques Kubrick bought him a Graflex camera, triggering Kubrick’s fascination with still photography. Stanley was also interested in jazz, attempting a brief career as a drummer. In 1951, Stanley’s friend, Alex Singer, persuaded him to start making short documentaries for the March of Time, a provider of newsreels to movie theaters. Stanley agreed, and independently financed Day of the Fight (1951). Although the distributor went out of business that year, Stanley sold Day of the Fight to RKO Pictures for a profit of one hundred dollars.

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Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Series-Disabled Legend David Beckham

David Beckham suffers from OCD and it manifests itself through constant cleanliness and perfection of all that is around him. Anything out of order is enough to cause a conflict and must be attended to immediately. Examples of this complete order is that everything must be in pairs, if there are three books on a table one must be added, or one must be removed. Only 2% of the population suffer from this strong OCD.

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Dyslexia Series-Disabled Legend Nolan Ryan

Lynn Nolan Ryan, Jr. was born on 31 January, 1947. Nolan is a former pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for more than a quarter century and still holds many major league pitching records. Ryan played in a major league record 27 seasons for the New York Mets, California Angels, Houston Astros, and Texas Rangers, from 1966 to 1993. Nolan is the all-time leader in no-hitters with seven, three more than any other pitcher. Nolan is tied with Bob Feller for the most one-hitters, with 12. Ryan also pitched 18 two-hitters.

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Dyslexia Series-Disabled Legend Magic Johnson

Magic Johnson – Earvin Effay Johnson, Jr. was born on 14 August, 1959 in Lansing, Michigan. Magic is a retired American National Basketball Association (NBA) basketball player for the Los Angeles Lakers. Johnson is acknowledged as one of the most popular NBA basketball players of all time, being well-known for his uncanny passing and dribbling skills, and for his cheerful nature on and off the court. In the words of Magic Johnson: “The looks, the stares, the giggles . . . I wanted to show everybody that I could do better and also that I could read.”

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Epilepsy Series-Disabled Legend Chanda Gunn

Chanda Gunn was born on 27 January, 1980 in Huntington Beach, California. Chanda Gunn is an American ice hockey player. Chanda Gunn won a bronze medal at the 2006 Winter Olympics. As a female athlete with temporal lobe epilepsy, Chanda Gunn faces each day with a zest for life and the determination to live each day to its fullest. Gunn has received numerous awards, she is the first player ever to be named a finalist for both the Patty Kazmaier Award for the nation’s best women’s college hockey player and the Humanitarian Award for college hockey’s finest citizen.

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