Dementia Series-Disabled Legend Joe Adcock

Joseph Wilbur “Billy Joe” Adcock was born on 30 October, 1927 and died on 3 May, 1999at the age of 71 in Coushatta. Joe was an American first baseman and right-handed batter in Major League Baseball, best known for his years with the powerful Milwaukee Braves teams of the 1950s, whose career included numerous home run feats. A sure-handed defensive player, he also retired with the third highest career fielding percentage by a first baseman (.994). Joseph’s nickname “Billy Joe” was modeled after Vanderbilt University basketball star “Billy Joe Adcock” and was popularized by Vin Scully.

Joseph Adcock was born in Coushatta, Louisiana. Joseph was signed by the Cincinnati Reds after a successful run at Louisiana State University, but Ted Kluszewski had firm hold of the team’s first base slot. Joseph Adcock played in left field from 1950 to 1952, but was unhappy and demanded a trade, which he received. Joseph’s first season with the Braves was capped by a mammoth home run into the center field bleachers at the Polo Grounds on 29 April, 1953, a feat that had never been done before and would only be accomplished twice more, by Hank Aaron and Lou Brock.

On 31 July, 1954, he accomplished the rare feat of homering four times in a single game, against the Brooklyn Dodgers at Ebbets Field, and set a new record for most total bases in a game (18) that stood until broken by Shawn Green in 2002.

Another notable home run was the blast that ended the epic duel between Lew Burdette and Harvey Haddix on 26 May, 1959, in which Haddix took a perfect game into the 12th inning. Joseph Adcock did not get credit for a home run, however, because Aaron – who was on first base – saw Felix Mantilla, the runner ahead of him, score the winning run and thought the hit had only been a double and walked back to the dugout, causing Adcock to be called out for passing him on the base paths.

Joseph Adcock was often overshadowed both by his own teammates Aaron and Eddie Mathews, and by the other slugging first basemen in the league, Kluszewski and Gil Hodges, but he did make one All-Star team (1960) and was regularly among the league leaders in home runs. In 1956, he finished second in the National League in home runs, runs batted in, and slugging average. After playing for the Cleveland Indians (1963) and Los Angeles/California Angels (1964-66), Joseph Adcock managed the Cleveland Indians for one year (1967) and managed 2 more years in the minor leagues before settling down at his 288-acre (1.2 km²) ranch in Coushatta to raise horses.

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Dementia Series-Disabled Legend Arlene Francis

Arlene Francis, the witty actress and popular television personality, was born Arlene Francis Kazanjian on 20 October, 1907 in Boston, Massachusetts. Arlene’s father was an Armenian immigrant, later painter and portrait photographer; her mother was the daughter of actor Alfred Davis. Even at an early age, Arlene said, “I started out with one goal: I wanted to be a serious actress.” Arlene studied at the Theatre Guild and then went to Hollywood. Arlene’s movie debut was in Murders in the Rue Morgue (1932), in which Bela Lugosi (often cast as a villain or mad scientist in many of his over 40 movies) tied her to an X-cross to extract her blood (trivia: Arlene and Bela were both born on Oct. 20). The live theater, however, was her first love, and she appeared in many plays. In 1935, she married movie executive Neil Agnew; they’d stay together for 10 years. Arlene made her Broadway debut in 1936 and had her first major role in “All That Glitters” two years later. Arlene appeared with Orson Welles in the Mercury Theatre production of “Danton’s Death” in 1938, and in “Journey to Jerusalem” in 1940. Arlene’s big hit was “The Doughgirls” in 1942; it ran for 1-1/2 years. Arlene had auditioned for her first radio part at the same time she was getting started in the theater; she later recalled, “Radio came easily.” In the 1940s, she played in as many as five radio serials a day.

Arlene married actor Martin Gabel in 1946 (he died in 1986), and they had a son, Peter. Arlene also was host of a radio dating show called “Blind Date,” which was adapted to a TV series in 1949 (“Blind Date” (1949)), and she was the host (1949-1952). It was television that brought Arlene fame, and she became one of the highest-paid women in TV. Arlene was a permanent panelist on CBS’ “What’s My Line?” (1950) (a ‘Mark Goodson (I)’ -Bill Todman production) from 1950 through 1967 and continued as a panelist in a syndicated version that ran until 1975, thus being with the show for its entire 25-year run. Arlene was warm, witty and had a cute laugh and was always fashionably dressed. Arlene wore a diamond heart-shaped necklace, which started a fad. Arlene was still doing radio while on TV, and in 1960, she was the star of “The Arlene Francis Show,” a daily interview show in New York, on WOR; it ran for 23 years. Arlene retired from show business after that and lived comfortably. Arlene was still giving interviews in 1991.

Arlene spent her last years living in San Francisco. Arlene died of cancer on Thursday 31 May 2001, in a Francisco hospital, at the age of 93. Arlene’s many fans will miss her, Arlene was truly one of the greats.

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Dementia Series-Disabled Legend Kay Swift

Kay Swift was born in 1897 and died in 1993. Kay Swift was an American composer of popular and classical music, the first woman to score a complete musical. Kay Swift was educated as a classical musician and composer at the Institute of Musical Art(now known as the Juilliard School). Kay Swift teacher of composition was Charles Loeffler, while harmony and composition was taught to her by Percy Goetschius. Kay’s marriage to a cowboy and subsequent move to Oregon prompted an autobiographical novel, Who Could Ask For Anything More? Which was made into the film Never a Dull Moment in 1950, which had a Kay Swift musical score.

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Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Series-Disabled Legend Marc Summers

Marc Summers was born Marc Berkowitz on 11 November, 1951 in Indianapolis, Indiana. Marc is an American television personality, popular game show host, producer, and a two-time talk show host, perhaps best known for hosting the children’s game show Double Dare on Nickelodeon. During an interview with Dr. Eric Hollander on Biggers & Summers, Summers revealed that he has obsessive compulsive disorder. Summers went public about his condition on various television shows, including The Oprah Winfrey Show and The Today Show. In 1999, Summers co-wrote a book with Hollander about his experience called Everything In Its Place: My Trials and Triumphs with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder.

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Tourettes Syndrome Series-Disabled Legend Marc Summers

Marc Summers was a popular tv host and entertainer, he had an obsessive-compulsive disorder and would do everything a certain way, anything else wouldn’t work. When he would take a shower at a hotel he would wear flip-flops to avoid touching the floor, he would not remove them until inside the shower. Marc would have a great fear of losing, he wanted to win whatever happened regardless of who he was playing with. When it was time to play basket-ball or monopoly he would not accept losing, even to his children.

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