Speech Differences And Stutter Series-Disabled Legend Bob Love

Robert (Bob) Earl “Butterbean” Love was born on 8 December, 1942, in Bastrop, Louisiana. Bob Love is a retired American professional basketball player who spent the prime of his career with the NBA’s Chicago Bulls. A versatile forward who could shoot with either his left or right hand, Bob Love now works as the Bulls’ Director of Community Affairs.

After starring at Morehouse High School (now defunct) in Bastrop, Louisiana, Bob Love played basketball for Southern University, where he also became a brother of Alpha Phi Omega. Bob Love earned All-America honours in 1963, and in 1965, the Cincinnati Royals selected the 6’8” forward in the 4th round of the 1965 NBA Draft. Bob Love failed to make the team, and instead spent the 1965-66 NBA season in the Eastern Basketball League. After averaging over 25 points per game, Bob Love earned the EBL Rookie of the Year Award and gained enough confidence to try out for the Royals once more. Bob Love made the team on his 2nd attempt and played 2 seasons for the Royals, largely in a reserve role. In 1968, the Milwaukee Bucks selected him in the NBA Expansion Draft and traded him to the Chicago Bulls in the middle of the 1968-69 season.

Bob Love flourished while playing for Dick Motta’s Bulls. In 1969-1970, he became a full-time starter, averaging 21 points and 8.7 rebounds. The following 2 seasons he averaged 25.2 and 25.8 points per game, appeared in his 1st 2 All-Star Games, and earned All-NBA 2nd Team honours both seasons. Bob Love also appeared in the 1973 NBA All-Star Game, and he would average at least 19 points and 6 rebounds every season until 1976-1977. Bob Love was named to the NBA’s All-Defense 2nd Team in 1974 and 1975.

Bob Love’s No. 10 jersey was the 2nd jersey number to be retired by the Chicago Bulls. Jerry Sloan’s No. 4 was the 1st. Bob Love’s 1995 wedding ceremony to Rachel Dixon took place at the United Center.

Bob Love retired in 1977 with career totals of 13,895 points and 4,653 rebounds. Bob Love suffered from a severe stuttering problem, which prevented him from finding meaningful employment after his playing days were over. At one point, Bob Love was a busboy making $4.45 an hour. Eventually, the owner of the restaurant where Bob Love washed dishes offered to pay for speech therapy classes, and in 1993 he returned to the Chicago Bulls as their director of community relations. One of his duties in this position involves regularly speaking to school children. Bob Love has also become a motivational speaker.

Bob Love wrote a book, The Bob Love Story: If It’s Gonna Be, It’s Up to Me, in 1999.

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Speech Differences And Stutter Series-Disabled Legend Bo Jackson

Vincent Edward “Bo” Jackson was born on 30 November, 1962 in Bessemer, Alabama, USA. Bo Jackson is an American athlete and a former multi-sport professional. Bo Jackson played at the highest level of sports in the United States in both American football and baseball.

In football, Bo Jackson played running back for the Los Angeles Raiders of the National Football League. In baseball, Bo Jackson played left field and designated hitter for the Kansas City Royals, the Chicago White Sox, and the California Angels of the American League in Major League Baseball.

Although a hip injury severely impaired his professional career, Bo Jackson was the 1st athlete to be named an All-Star in 2 major sports. Before his professional career, he earned the 1985 Heisman Trophy, the prize annually awarded to the most outstanding collegiate football player in the United States. Bo Jackson also ran a 4.12 40 yard dash.

In 1989 and 1990, Bo Jackson’s name became known beyond just sports fans through the “Bo Knows” advertising campaign, a series of advertisements by Nike promoting a cross-training athletic shoe named for Bo Jackson.

Bo Jackson, the 8th of 10 children, was named after Vince Edwards, his mother’s favourite actor. Bo Jackson’s family described him as a “wild boar,” as he would constantly get into trouble. The nickname was eventually shortened to “Bo.”

Bo Jackson attended McAdory High School, where he rushed for 1,175 yards as a running back in his senior-year football season. That year, Bo Jackson also hit 20home runs in 25 games for McAdory’s baseball team.

In June 1982, Bo Jackson was selected by the New York Yankees in the 2nd round of the MLB draft, but he instead chose to attend Auburn University on a football scholarship. Bo Jackson was recruited by head coach Pat Dye and then Auburn assistant coach Bobby Wallace. At Auburn, he proved to be a tremendous athlete in both baseball and football.

Bo Jackson graduated from Auburn with a degree in adult education.

Bo Jackson batted .401 with 17 home runs and 43 RBI in 1985. In a 1985 baseball game against the Georgia Bulldogs at Foley Field in Athens, Georgia, Bo Jackson led Auburn to victory with a 4-for-5 performance, with 3 home runs and a double. Bo Jackson launched his last home run that day into a brand new light standard. Bo Jackson was declared ineligible to play in the 1986 baseball season after taking a flight to Florida to undergo a physical examination for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers.

During his time playing for the Auburn Tigers football team, he ran for 4,303 career yards, which was the 4th best performance in SEC history behind Herschel Walker of Georgia. Bo Jackson finished his career with an average of 6.6 yards per carry, which set the SEC record (minimum 400 rushes).

In 1982, Bo Jackson’s freshman year, Auburn Tigers played Boston College in the Tangerine Bowl, where Bo Jackson made a one-handed grab of an option pitch that quarterback Randy Campbell lobbed over the head of a defender. Auburn Tigers went on to win the game.

In 1983, as a sophomore, Bo Jackson rushed for 1,213 yards on 158 carries, for an average of 7.7 yards per carry, which was the 2nd best single-season average in SEC history (min. 100 rushes). In the 1983 Auburn Tigers-Alabama game, Bo Jackson rushed for 256yards on 20 rushes (12.8 yards per carry), which at the time was the 6th-most rushing yards gained in a game in SEC history and the 2nd best yard-per-rush average in a game (min. 20 attempts) in SEC history. Auburn Tigers finished the season by winning the Sugar Bowl, where Bo Jackson was named Most Valuable Player. In 1984, Bo Jackson’s junior year (most of which Bo Jackson missed due to injury), he earned Most Valuable Player honours at Liberty Bowl.

In 1985, Bo Jackson rushed for 1,786 yards, which was the 2nd best single-season performance in SEC history behind Herschel Walker’s 1,891 rushing yards for the University of Georgia in 1981. That year, he averaged 6.4 yards per rush, which at the time was the best single-season average in SEC history. For his performance in 1985, Bo Jackson was awarded the Heisman Trophy in what was considered the closest margin of victory ever in the history of the award, winning over University of Iowa Quarterback Chuck Long.

Bo Jackson’s football number 34 was officially retired at Auburn Tigers in a halftime ceremony on October 31, 1992. Bo Jackson is 1 of only 3 numbers retired at Auburn Tigers, the others being 1971 Heisman Trophy winner Pat Sullivan’s number 7, and Pat Sullivan’s teammate and favourite receiver, Terry Beasley (88). In 2007, Bo Jackson was ranked #8 on ESPN’s Top 25 Players In College Football History list.

Bo Jackson qualified for the 60-yard dash in his freshman and sophomore years. Bo Jackson considered joining the USA Olympic team, but sprinting would not gain him the financial security of the MLB or NFL, nor would he have sufficient time to train, given his other commitments.

Bo Jackson was drafted by the Tampa Bay Buccaneers as the 1st pick of the 1986 NFL Draft, but he opted to play baseball for the Kansas City Royals, the defending World Series champions, instead. Bo Jackson spent most of the season with the Memphis Chicks in the minor leagues before being called up for regular duty in 1987, where he had 22 home runs, 53 RBIs and 10 stolen bases as an outfielder for the Royals.

Bo Jackson began to show his true potential in 1989, when he was voted to start for the American League All-Star team, and was named the game’s MVP for his play on both offense and defense. Bo Jackson’s great plays in the game included a monstrous home run off Rick Reuschel of the San Francisco Giants which landed an estimated 448 feet from home plate – in his 1st All-Star at-bat. Bo Jackson also beat out an infield hit that resulted in the game-winning RBI. In addition to this, he had a stolen base, making him 1 of only 2 players in All-Star Game history to hit a home run and steal a base in the same game (the other is Willie Mays). Baseball announcer Vin Scully (calling the game for NBC-TV) was moved to comment, “And look at that one! Bo Jackson says hello!”

In 1990, he raised his batting average, but the uncertainty of his 2 sport loyalties may have swayed Royals management to not utilize him as much as he could have been.

On 5 June, 1989, Bo Jackson ran down a long line-drive deep to left field on a hit-and-run play against the Seattle Mariners. With speedy Harold Reynolds running from 1st base on the play, Scott Bradley’s hit would have been deep enough to score him against most outfielders. But Bo Jackson, from the warning track, turned flat footed and fired a strike to catcher Bob Boone, who tagged the sliding Reynolds out. Bo Jackson’s throw reached Bob Boone on the fly. Interviewed for the “Bo Jackson” episode of ESPN Classic’s SportsCentury, Harold Reynolds admitted that he thought there was no way anyone would throw him out on such a deep drive into the gap in left-center, and was shocked to see his teammate telling him to slide as he rounded 3rd base.

On 11 July, 1990 against the Baltimore Orioles, Bo Jackson performed his famous “wall run,” when he caught a ball approximately 2–3 strides away from the wall. As he caught the ball at full tilt, Bo Jackson looked up and noticed the wall and began to run up the wall, 1 leg reaching higher as he ascended. Bo Jackson ran along the wall almost parallel to the ground, and came down with the catch, to avoid impact and the risk of injury from the fence.

After a poor at bat he was known to snap the bat over his knee, or with his helmet on, over his head. This is illustrated in Bo Jackson’s 1991 Score “Bo Breaker” card.

Before Bo Jackson finished his career in California he spent 2 years playing for the Chicago White Sox, mostly as a Designated Hitter, as his hip injury hampered his ability to play the outfield. It was with the White Sox that he made his only post-season appearance in the 1993 American League Championship Series, which Chicago lost to the Toronto Blue Jays in 6 games.

While with the Sox, Bo Jackson promised his mum that once he returned from his hip replacement surgery that he would hit a home run for her. Before he could return, his mother died. In his 1st at bat after surgery he hit a home run to right field. Bo Jackson had the ball engraved in his mother’s tombstone.

In his 8 baseball seasons, Bo Jackson had a career batting average of .250, hit 141 home runs and had 415 RBIs, with a slugging average of .474. Bo Jackson’s best year was 1989, with his effort earning him all-star status. In ’89, Bo Jackson ranked in the league in both homers and RBI with 32/105.

Bo Jackson was drafted 1st overall in the 1986 NFL Draft by the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. However, the Buccaneers, not wanting their new draftee to injure himself playing baseball for Auburn Tigers that year, took Bo Jackson on a trip in a private plane that cost him his college eligibility. They also gave Bo Jackson an ultimatum to choose baseball or football. This prompted him to sign with the Kansas City Royals. Since he did not sign with a team by the 1987 draft, his rights were forfeited by Tampa Bay and his name was thrown back into the draft. The Los Angeles Raiders selected Bo Jackson in the 7th round with the 183rd overall pick. The Los Angeles Raiders owner Al Davis supported Bo Jackson and his baseball career and got Bo Jackson to sign a contract by offering him a salary that was comparable to a full-time starting running back but allowing Bo Jackson to only play part-time until the baseball season was done.

Joining the Los Angeles Raiders midway through the 1987 season, Bo Jackson rushed for 554 yards on 81 carries in just 7 games. Over the next 3 seasons, Bo Jackson would rush for 2,228 more yards and 12 touchdowns: a remarkable achievement, in light of the fact that he was a “2nd string” player behind Marcus Allen.

Bo Jackson turned in a 221-yard rushing performance on Monday Night Football in 1987 against the Seattle Seahawks. During this game, he ran over Seahawks linebacker Brian Bosworth, who had insulted Bo Jackson and promised in a media event before the game to contain Bo Jackson. Bo Jackson also made a 91-yard run to the outside, untouched down the sideline. Bo Jackson continued sprinting until finally slowing down as he passed through the entrance to the field tunnel to the dressing rooms with teammates soon following. Bo Jackson scored 2 rushing touchdowns and 1 receiving touchdown in the game.

In his 4 seasons in the NFL, Bo Jackson rushed for 2,782 yards and 16 touchdowns with an average yards per carry of 5.4. Bo Jackson also caught 40 passes for 352 yards and 2 touchdowns. Bo Jackson’s 221 yards on 30 November, 1987, just 29 days after his 1st NFL carry, is still a Monday Night Football record.

On 13 January, 1991, during a Los Angeles Raiders playoff game against the Cincinnati Bengals, Bo Jackson suffered a serious hip injury while being tackled by linebacker Kevin Walker. The injury ended his football career and seriously threatened his baseball career. After Bo Jackson was tackled and lying in pain on the ground, he allegedly popped his hip back into place. In an interview on Untold, his Royals’ teammate George Brett, who attended the game, said he asked the trainer what had happened to Bo Jackson. The trainer replied “Bo says he felt his hip come out of the socket, so he popped it back in, but that’s just impossible, no one’s that strong.”

Following surgery and rehabilitation on his injured hip, it was discovered that Bo Jackson had avascular necrosis, as a result of decreased blood supply to the head of his left femur. This caused deterioration of the femoral head, ultimately requiring that the hip be replaced. Bo Jackson missed the entire 1992 baseball season. When he announced soon after his surgery that he would play baseball again, many thought that goal to be unrealistic, especially at the Major League level.

Before returning to his true professional sports, Bo Jackson tried his luck in basketball. Being a natural athlete, Bo Jackson played briefly for a semi-pro basketball team in L.A. Bo Jackson quickly retired.

Bo Jackson was able to return to the Chicago White Sox in 1993, and at his 1st at-bat, against the New York Yankees, he homered on his 1st swing. The next day Nike ran a full-page ad in USA Today; it simply read “Bo Knew.”

Bo Jackson would hit 16 home runs and 45 RBIs that season; yet while his power remained, he no longer possessed his blazing speed. During his time with the White Sox, Bo Jackson had no stolen bases. For the 1994 season, he was signed as a free agent by the California Angels for 1 final season, where he hit another 13 home runs in 201 at bats, before retiring.

Bo Jackson became a popular figure for his athleticism in multiple sports through the late 1980s and early 1990s. Bo Jackson endorsed Nike and was involved in a popular ad campaign called “Bo Knows” which envisioned Bo Jackson attempting to take up a litany of other sports, including tennis, golf, luge, auto racing, and even playing blues music with Bo Diddley, who scolded Bo Jackson by telling him “You don’t know diddley!”(In a later version of the spot, Bo Jackson is shown playing the guitar expertly, after which an impressed Diddley says, “Bo…you do know Diddley, don’t you?”)

Another clip, envisioning Bo Jackson playing ice hockey, was followed by Wayne Gretzky shaking his head in disbelief and dismissing the effort with a quick “No.” (In his autobiography, Gretzky says his negative rejoinder came in frustration after multiple takes of him saying “Bo knows hockey!” that the director didn’t like. Bo Jackson also said the bits showing Bo playing hockey were actually filmed on a wooden floor, with Bo Jackson in stocking feet.) T shirts sold by Nike capitalizing on their successful ad campaign had a list of Bo Jackson’s sports – both real and imagined – with hockey crossed out.

In a later spot, Bo Jackson sees all the hoopla surrounding him and says, “I have rehab to do! I don’t have time for this!”, after which boxer George Foreman says, “But I do!” and steps in to finish the commercial, now re-dubbed “George Knows.”

Bo Jackson also poked fun at the ad campaign during a guest appearance on a 1st season episode of Lois and Clark: The New Adventures of Superman. In the scene, he played basketball with Clark, portrayed by Dean Cain. Bo Jackson clearly is the better athlete, until Clark uses his flying abilities to catch the ball. Bo Jackson replies, “Bo don’t know that!”

Bo Jackson also made an appearance during in an episode of Fresh Prince of Bel-Air with Will Smith where he asks Will, as “his close personal friend”, some advice on what to cook for a party saying “an’ when it comes to cooking, Bo Jackson don’t know diddley”.

Bo Jackson’s legend was further cemented by his digital counterpart, affectionately known as “Tecmo Bo”, in the video game Tecmo Super Bowl for the Nintendo Entertainment System. “Tecmo Bo” is one of the best running backs — and arguably the most lethal athlete — in video game history. Players using “Tecmo Bo” have been able to rush for 800-900 yards per game and run all over the field on one play and run out the time of a whole quarter without being tackled.

In retirement, his legend is intertwined with what many 25-35 year-olds recall as the 2nd golden age of home video gaming. Bo Jackson has commented that fans will often come up to him and regale him with stories not of his actual football feats, but rather memorable Tecmo Bowl plays.

Bo Jackson also had his own video game for the original Game Boy portable gaming system, Bo Jackson’s Hit and Run. The game featured both baseball and football, but had no pro licenses for either sport and could not use any team or players’ names. Released around the same time was Bo Jackson Baseball for the Nintendo NES system and IBM compatible computers. The game was heavily criticized by game reviewers and obtained poor sales results.

Bo Jackson had also made an appearance in the recent video game NFL Street 2 released in 2004 as the half back in the Gridiron Legends team. Unlocked by performing a wall move on a hotspot on the sportsplex field, he is available in the pickup pool for pickup games where you pick 7 players from the NFL. When playing the street event “open field showdown”, if you had not made an extremely fast character already in own the city mode or NFL challenge, he will always be picked by the computer. If you completed NFL challenge, you can choose him to be on your team or any other Gridiron legend once you complete the mode.

Following on the heels of this widespread fame, Bo Jackson appeared in ProStars, an NBC Saturday morning cartoon. The show featured Bo Jackson, Wayne Gretzky, and Michael Jordan fighting crime and helping children (although none of the athletes featured actually provided their voices).

In 2007, Nike released a set of Nike Dunk shoes honouring Bo Jackson. The set featured 3 colourways based on previously released Nike shoes: the “Bo Knows” Trainer I, Trainer 91, and Medicine Ball Trainer III.

In 1993, Bo Jackson was honoured with the Tony Conigliaro Award. In 1995, he completed his bachelor of science degree at Auburn to fulfill the promise he made to his mother.

Through the 1990s, Bo Jackson dabbled in acting, having made several television guest appearances 1st on The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air in 1990 as well as Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman and Married with Children. Bo Jackson later appeared in small roles in the films The Chamber and Fakin’ Da Funk.

Bo Jackson served as the President of the HealthSouth Sports Medicine Council, part of Birmingham, Alabama based HealthSouth Corporation. Bo Jackson was also spokesman for HealthSouth’s “Go For It”: Roadshow.

Bo Jackson was given the honour of throwing out the ceremonial 1st pitch before Game 2 of the 2005 World Series.

In 2006, Bo Jackson appeared on the Spike TV sports reality show, Pros vs. Joes. In his 2nd appearance, he easily defeated amateur athletes in a home run-hitting contest. When he bunted instead of swinging on his final try for a home run, the announcer stated, “Bo knows taunting.”

In 2007, Bo Jackson came together with John Cangelosi to form Bo Jackson Elite Sports Complex, an 88,000 square foot multi-sports dome facility in Lockport, Illinois. Bo Jackson is part-owner and CEO of the facility.

To this day he and his family live in Burr Ridge, Illinois.

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Speech Differences And Stutter Series-Disabled Legend Adrian Peterson

Adrian Lewis Peterson was born on 21 March, 1985 in Palestine, Texas. Nicknamed “A.D.” (for “All Day”) or “Purple Jesus”, is a professional American football running back for the Minnesota Vikings of the National Football League (NFL). Adrian Peterson played college football as a running back for 3 years at the University of Oklahoma. At Oklahoma, Adrian Peterson set the NCAA freshman rushing record with 1,925 yards (as a true freshman). Adrian Peterson was a 1st team All-American, and he also set a freshman record by finishing as the runner-up in the Heisman Trophy balloting. Adrian Peterson finished as the school’s 3rd all-time leading rusher.

Adrian Peterson was selected by the Minnesota Vikings with the 7th overall pick in the 1st round of the 2007 NFL Draft. Coming into the league, he was known as a tall, upright runner possessing a rare combination of speed, strength, agility, size, and vision, along with a highly aggressive running style. Adrian Peterson’s rare talent as both a great breakaway and power runner has often raised comparisons to past legends, including Eric Dickerson, O.J. Simpson, Walter Payton, Gale Sayers, and Jim Brown. As a rookie in the NFL, he broke numerous franchise and league records for rushing yardage, the foremost being the NFL single-game rushing record when he ran for 296 yards on 30 carries on 4 November, 2007, against the San Diego Chargers. Following his stellar 1st pro season, Adrian Peterson was a near-unanimous choice as the NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year. In the 2008 NFL Pro Bowl, Adrian Peterson rushed for 129 yards and 2 touchdowns, achieving the 2nd highest rushing total in Pro Bowl history. Adrian Peterson was awarded the MVP award for his performance in the Pro Bowl, which led to a 42-30 victory over the AFC.

Adrian Peterson has 1 daughter, Adeja. Adrian Peterson currently resides in Eden Prairie, Minnesota, a suburb of Minneapolis, Minnesota, with his brothers, Eldon, and Derrick Peterson.

Adrian Peterson was interested in football as a child as he began playing at the age of 7 and participated in the popular Pop Warner Football programme. Adrian Peterson continued his interest in athletics into high school where he competed in track and field, basketball, and football at Palestine High School. Adrian Peterson was most notable in football where he played during his junior and senior years. Adrian Peterson finished his 2002 campaign as a junior with 2,051 yards on 246 carries, an average of 8.3 yards per carry, and 22 touchdowns. As a senior in 2003, he rushed for 2,960 yards on 252 attempts, an average of 11.7 yards per carry, and 32 touchdowns. Concluding his high school football career at the annual U.S. Army All-American Bowl, he led the West squad with 95 yards on 9 carries and scoring 2 touchdowns and announced at the game he would attend college at Oklahoma. Among his other choices of schools were the University of Southern California, University of Texas at Austin, Texas A&M University, University of California, Los Angeles, University of Arkansas, and University of Miami. Following the season, he was awarded the Hall Trophy as the Ball Park National High School Player of the Year. In addition, he was named the top high school player by College Football News and Rivals.com.

During his freshman season, Adrian Peterson broke many NCAA freshman rushing records, rushing for 1925 yards and leading the nation in carries with 339. Adrian Peterson was a finalist for the Heisman Trophy, finishing 2nd to USC quarterback Matt Leinart, which was the highest finish ever for a freshman. Adrian Peterson was also a finalist for the Doak Walker Award. Among other honours include being the 1st Oklahoma freshman recognised as a 1st-Team Associated Press All-American. Adrian Peterson contributed to an undefeated season for the Oklahoma Sooners and participated in the 2005 BCS National Championship Game with a berth to the FedEx Orange Bowl.

Adrian Peterson’s playing time in 2005 was limited by a high ankle sprain. Adrian Peterson injured his ankle in the 1st Big 12 Conference game of the season against Kansas State University. Despite missing time in 4 games, he rushed for 1,208 yards and 14 touchdowns on 220 carries, finishing 2nd in Big 12 rushing yardage. Adrian Peterson’s 2005 season was also notable for a career-long 84 yard touchdown run against Oklahoma State University. Upon the conclusion of the season, he was named a member of the All-Big 12 Conference team.

Nelson Peterson was released from prison during the 2006 college football season and was able to watch his son as a spectator for the 1st time on 14 October, 2006 when Oklahoma played Iowa State University. Oklahoma defeated Iowa State in that game, but Adrian Peterson broke his collar bone falling into the end zone to end a 53 yard touchdown run. During a press conference on 18 October, Adrian Peterson said he was told by doctors to expect to be out for 4 to 6 weeks. At the time of the injury, Adrian Peterson needed only 150 yards to gain to pass Billy Sims as the University of Oklahoma’s all-time leading rusher. Adrian Peterson was unable to return for the rest of the Sooners regular season, but returned for the Sooners’ last game against Boise State in the 2007 Fiesta Bowl, where he rushed for 77 yards and a touchdown. Adrian Peterson refused to discuss his plans beyond the end of this season with the press. Adrian Peterson concluded his college football career with 1,112 rushing yards his final season, even after missing multiple games due to injury for a total of 4,045 rushing yards (only 3 season). Adrian Peterson was 73 yards short of passing Billy Sims as Oklahoma’s all-time leading rusher.

Awards And Honours

Hall Trophy (2003)
First-team AP All-Freshman (2004)
First-team AP All-American (2004)
Doak Walker Award finalist (2004)
Heisman Trophy finalist (2004)

On 15 January, 2007, Adrian Peterson declared that he would forego his senior year of college and enter the 2007 NFL Draft. Concerns about his injuries suffered during college were noted by the media and potential NFL teams. Adrian Peterson started 22 out of 31 games in his college career and missed games due to a dislocated shoulder his 1st year, a high ankle sprain his sophomore year, and a broken collarbone his final year at Oklahoma. Adrian Peterson’s durability was a consideration by at least 2 teams in their draft analysis, which impacted selection position. Prior to the 2007NFL Draft, Adrian Peterson was compared by professional football scouts to Eric Dickerson. ESPN NFL Draft analyst Mel Kiper, Jr. said of Peterson, “You can make the argument,[Peterson]is the best player in this draft, if not, certainly 1 of the top 3.”

On 28 April, 2007, Adrian Peterson was selected by the Minnesota Vikings with the 7th overall pick in the 1st round of the 2007 NFL Draft. Adrian Peterson was the 1st running back selected in that year’s draft. At a press conference during the draft, Adrian Peterson announced, “My collarbone, I would say it’s 90% healed. A lot of teams know that, and I don’t see it stopping me from being prepared for the season.”

After being drafted by the Vikings, there was speculation that Adrian Peterson would require surgery to fully heal the collarbone injury he suffered during college, but it was soon learned that was not the case.

Adrian Peterson believes he is a player that a franchise can build around. In an interview with IGN following the NFL Draft, he said, “I’m a player who is coming in with the determination to turn a team around. I want to help my team get to the playoffs, win…and run wild. I want to bring people to the stands. I want people to come to the game to see what I can do next. Things like that can change the whole attitude of an organisation. I want to win.” Adrian Peterson later told the Star Tribune in an interview, “I want to be the best player to ever play this game.”

Nearly 3 months after being drafted, he was signed by the Vikings on 29 July, 2007. Adrian Peterson’s contract is worth US$40.5,000,000 over 5 years, with $17,000,000 guaranteed.

Adrian Peterson’s outstanding rookie season began with high expectations from Adrian Peterson himself; he announced ambitious goals including being named Offensive Rookie of the Year, rushing for 1,800 yards during the course of the year, and breaking the league’s rookie rushing record just as he broke the freshman rushing record during his 1st season at Oklahoma. The NFL’s rushing record for a rookie is currently held by Eric Dickerson at 1,808 yards. Just 11 weeks into his rookie season with the Vikings, Adrian Peterson was well on his way to Eric Dickerson’s record and considered one of the elite running backs in the NFL.

On 10 August, Adrian Peterson made his Minnesota Vikings debut in a preseason game against the St. Louis Rams. Adrian Peterson ran for 33 yards on 11 carries with 1 catch for 2 yards. On 9 September, 2007, Adrian Peterson ran for 103 yards on 19carries in his 1st NFL regular season game against the Atlanta Falcons. In addition to his rushing yardage, he scored his 1st professional football touchdown on a 60 yard pass reception. Over his 1st 3 regular season games, his 431 yards (271 rushing & 160 receiving) from scrimmage are a team record. For his performance during the 3 games, Adrian Peterson received the NFL Offensive Rookie of the Month award for both September and October 2007.

Adrian Peterson’s breakout game as a professional came on 14 October, 2007 against the Chicago Bears, highlighted by a 3 touchdown performance and a then franchise record of 224 yards rushing on 20 carries. Adrian Peterson established additional team records for a rookie during this game, which included the most 100-yard games rushing and the longest touchdown run from scrimmage. Adrian Peterson also set an NFL rookie record with 361 all-purpose yards in a single game. Adrian Peterson’s 607 rushing yards through the 1st 5 games of the season is 2nd in NFL history to Eric Dickerson. Following Adrian Peterson’s record performance, Deion Sanders, now an NFL Network analyst said the following about Adrian Peterson: “He has the vision of a Marshall Faulk, the power of an Earl Campbell, and the speed of an Eric Dickerson. Let’s pray he has the endurance of an Emmitt Smith.” Adrian Peterson has also been compared to Walter Payton and Tony Dorsett by Star Tribune sports journalist Jim Souhan.

3 weeks later on 4 November, 2007, Adrian Peterson broke his own franchise record as well as the NFL single game rushing yard record previously held by Jamal Lewis since 2003 when he rushed for 296 yards on 30 carries and 3 touchdowns against the San Diego Chargers. That game was his 2nd game of over 200 yards rushing, a feat no other rookie has ever accomplished in a season. In addition to the NFL rushing record in a single game, it took him past 1,000 yards rushing for the year after just 8 games. Adrian Peterson’s 1,036 rushing yards represents the best 8-game performance by a rookie in NFL history.

On 11 November, 2007, just a week after his record-breaking performance against the Chargers, Adrian Peterson injured the lateral collateral ligament in his right knee in a game against the Green Bay Packers. The injury occurred in the 3rd quarter of a 34-0 defeat at Lambeau Field on a low, yet clean tackle by Packers cornerback Al Harris. Almost a month after the injury, Adrian Peterson returned to action on 2 December, 2007 against the Detroit Lions scoring 2 touchdowns and rushing for 116 yards. On 17 December Adrian Peterson played in his 1st Monday Night Football game where he had 78 yards rushing, 17 yards receiving and 2 TDs. The next day Adrian Peterson was named as the starting running back for the 2008 NFC Pro Bowl team. On 2 January, he was named The Associated Press NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year.

On 10 February, 2008, Adrian Peterson won the 2008 NFL Pro Bowl MVP award with 16 carries for 129 yards rushing along with 2 touchdowns. The 129 yards rushing was the 2nd most in Pro Bowl history. Adrian Peterson was the 1st rookie since Marshall Faulk in 1995 to win the Pro Bowl MVP award.

Adrian Peterson finished in 2nd place in rushing yards (1341)in the 2007 season behind LaDainian Tomlinson, who finished with (1474) rushing yards.

Adrian Peterson and the Vikings entered the 2008 season with high expectations and as he did during his rookie season, Adrian Peterson set high goals for himself including a 2000-yard campaign and the NFL MVP award. Questions remained as to Adrian Peterson’s durability and the ability of the Vikings offense to take the focus of opposing defenses off of Adrian Peterson. In the 1st game of the season against the Packers, Adrian Peterson ran for 103 yards on 19 carries and a TD, including 1 reception for 11 yards. In week 2 against the Colts, Adrian Peterson had 29 carries for 160 yards and 4 receptions for 20 yards. Against Carolina in week 3 Adrian Peterson ran for 77 yards on 17 carries. In week 4 Adrianh Peterson ran the ball 18 times for 80 yards and 2 TDs against the Titans. Adrian Peterson also had 4 catches 21 yards. Against New Orleans he ran for a dismal 32 yards on 21 yards and 9 yards on a catch. Week 6 against Detroit Adrian ran for 111 yards on 25 carries and 1catch for -5 yards, but he had 2 vital fumbles that almost lost them the game. Adrian Peterson currently ranks 3rd in the NFL in rushing and 6th in yards from scrimmage.

Records

Most 200-yard rushing games for a rookie (2)
Most yards rushing in the first eight games (1,036)
Most yards rushing in a single game (296)

Awards

2008 NFL Pro Bowl MVP
2007 NFL AP Offensive Rookie of the Year
2007 Diet Pepsi NFL Rookie of the Year
Two 2007 Player of the Month awards
2008 Best Breakthrough Athlete ESPY Award

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Speech Differences And Stutter Series-Disabled Legend Nicholas Brendon

Nicholas Brendon was born on 12 April, 1971, in Los Angeles, California, USA as Nicholas Brendon Schultz. Nicholas Brendon is an actor best known for his character Xander Harris in the television series Buffy the Vampire Slayer (1997–2003).

When he was younger he had aspirations to be a professional baseball player, but was forced to give up the dream after an arm injury. At the age of 20 he decided to try his hand at acting to help him overcome his stuttering problem, but gave it up after 2 years because, “I couldn’t stand the politics in Hollywood.” Nicholas Brendon decided instead to go back to school and study medicine, but this did not work out. also tried his hand at a variety of other jobs including being a plumber’s assistant, veterinary janitor, day care counselor, waiter, and a production assistant for the television show Dave’s World. Nicholas Brendon gave acting another try after these jobs. It only took 4 days of auditioning before he landed the role of Xander Harris on Buffy.

Nicholas Brendon’s role on Buffy the Vampire Slayer as Xander Harris, was initially that of the occasional comic relief and plucky sidekick to the lead female characters, but after the earlier seasons less comedic lines were given to the part. When the series ended in 2003, Nicholas Brendon joined the cast of a new Fox sitcom, Kitchen Confidential, based on the book by chef Anthony Bourdain. 13 episodes were made, but the series was cancelled on 9 December of the same year, after the 4th episode aired with low ratings.

In 2006, he played Huntsboy #89 for season 2 of the animated series American Dragon: Jake Long. The series ended on 1 September, 2007. Nicholas Brendon character’s final appearance was in the episode “Shaggy Frog”, which aired on 28 April, 2007.

From 26 July through 30 August, 2006, Nicholas Brendon co-starred in the play Lobster Alice with Noah Wyle in Los Angeles.

That same year, Nicholas Brendon reunited with his former Buffy on-screen sweetheart, Charisma Carpenter, in the ABC Family TV movie Relative Chaos.

At a pop culture expo in Sydney, October 2007, he mentioned that he would be joining the cast of the CBS crime drama Criminal Minds as Penelope Garcia’s love interest.

In 2001, Nicholas Brendon married actress Tressa DiFiglia. As of 2007, they are divorced.

On 25, April 2004, at a Buffy fan convention in Cleveland, Ohio, he announced that he had voluntarily entered rehab for alcoholism.

Nicholas Brendon has played a major part in the Stuttering Foundation of America. Nicholas Brendon was the 1st person to serve the role of honourary chairperson of the Stuttering Foundation of America’s Stuttering Awareness Week for 3 consecutive years, from 2000 to 2003.

Nicholas Brendon has an identical twin brother, Kelly Donovan, who is 3 minutes older than he, and served as his occasional stand-in on Buffy. Kelly Donovan also played the part of Xander’s double in the episode “The Replacement” when the 2 Xanders were on the screen at the same time, and when Nicholas Brendon fell sick with pneumonia, he played Xander in most of the fight scenes in the episode “Intervention”.

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Speech Differences And Stutter Series-Disabled Legend Jermain Taylor

Jermain Taylor was born on 11 August, 1978 in Little Rock, Arkansas. Jermain Taylor is a professional American boxer and former undisputed middleweight champion of the world. Jermain Taylor currently has a record of 27-2-1, with 17 wins coming by way of knockout.

Jermain Taylor’s amateur career was stacked with accolades beginning with the 1996 Under-19 Championship; he then won a pair of PAL Championships and National Golden Gloves titles and finished 2nd and 3rd at the 1997 and 1998 U.S. Championships respectively.

Jermain Taylor then progressed to the next level in his amateur career by winning a bronze medal at the 1998 Goodwill Games. Jermain Taylor also competed in the 1998″Boxer of the Year” award in Texas, coming in an impressive 6th out of 452 entries.

Jermain Taylor was the 1st boxer from Arkansas ever to compete in the Olympic Games. The progression of fights to qualify for a spot on the US Team was as follows:

Defeated Fritz Roberts (Virgin Islands) TKO 2
Defeated Luis Sierra (Puerto Rico) TKO 3
Defeated Scott MacIntosh (Canada) on points
Defeated Hely Yanes (Venezuela) on points
Competing at the 2000 Olympics in Sydney, Australia, Taylor ended up winning the bronze medal.

The progression of fights at the Olympics was as follows:

Defeated Dmitry Usagin (Bulgaria) RSC 1
Defeated Scott MacIntosh (Canada) 23-9
Defeated Adnan Catic (Germany) 19-14
Lost to Yermakhan Ibraimov (Kazakhstan) RSC 4

Amateur highlights:

1998 United States Amateur Light Middleweight Champion.

Results included:

Defeated Yamar Resto on points
Defeated Philip Thrasher on points
Defeated Chris Lords on points
Defeated Anthony Hanshaw on points

1999 United States Amateur Championships at Light Middleweight.

Results were:

Defeated Santiago Rodriguez WDQ 3
Defeated Peter Manfredo Jr TKO 2
Lost to Anthony Hanshaw on points
1999 National Golden Gloves Champion at Light Middleweight.

Results were:

Defeated Jason Aaker by split decision
Defeated Peter Manfredo Jr on points
Defeated David Leal on points
Defeated Dorian Beaupierre on points
Defeated Anthony Hanshaw on points

Since early in his professional career, Jermain Taylor had been touted by many as being the heir apparent to middleweight king Bernard Hopkins. Jermain Taylor dominated all of his opponents at the beginning of his career, scoring wins over respectable fighters such as Raul Marquez and William Joppy (although both were at the end of their careers). On 19 February, 2005, Jermain Taylor defeated the previously unbeaten Daniel Edouard via TKO in round 3. With this win, Jermain Taylor earned a title bout against Bernard Hopkins, who had unified the four major world middleweight titles and was rated by Ring Magazine as the #1 “pound for pound” boxer in the world.

Jermain Taylor fought Bernard Hopkins for the undisputed middleweight championship on 16 July, 2005. Jermain Taylor was more active than the slow-starting Bernard Hopkins early in the fight, missing many of his punches but still winning the early rounds on the official score cards. While Bernard Hopkins gradually became more active and maintained his defense, Jermain Taylor continued to fight aggressively and won some of the middle rounds. Over the last 4 rounds, however, Bernard Hopkins became the aggressor and battered Jermain Taylor, shrinking Jermain Taylor’s lead on the scorecards. Nonetheless, Jermain Taylor survived the late surge and won the fight by split decision to become the new undisputed middleweight champion.

On 3 December, 2005, Jermain Taylor won the rematch against Bernard Hopkins again by a unanimous decision. All 3 judges scored the bout 115-113.

On 17 June, 2006, Jermain Taylor faced off against the number 1 contender, Winky Wright at the FedEx Forum in Memphis, Tennessee. Winky Wright surprised many by taking the fight to Jermain Taylor from the starting bell. From early on in the bout Winky Wright was able to trap Jermain Taylor in the corners and land combinations. The bigger and stronger Jermain Taylor, who threw more punches, owned the center of the ring. Jermain Taylor’s trainer, Manny Steward, urged Jermain Taylor to stay off the ropes. At several points, Jermain Taylor seemed close to overwhelming Winky Wright with power punches, but Winky Wright always responded with a flurry of his own to keep the match close. Midway through the bout, Jermain Taylor’s left eye started to swell dangerously.

By the end of the 11th, the fight was close, with Winky Wright holding a slight edge coming off a strong round. In the 12th, he seemed to have Jermain Taylor off guard with quick footwork and strong boxing, but Jermain Taylor rallied back. The match was scored 115-113 Jermain Taylor, 115-113 Winky Wright and 114-114, and Jermain Taylor retained his middleweight title. After the fight, an incensed Winky Wright left the ring quickly. When Larry Merchant managed to interview him later, Winky Wright made it clear that he felt he had done enough to win. “He didn’t do nothing in the 12th,” he said. “The fans saw I won that fight.” Jermain Taylor was complimentary of his opponent, saying that he did not think he had hurt Winky Wright, whose jab was faster than the champ expected. But, he added, “If he wanted the title so bad, he should have fought all 12 rounds.”

On 9 December, 2006, Jermain Taylor fought Kassim Ouma at the Alltel Arena in North Little Rock, Arkansas. The match was made because Winky Wright pulled out of a 2nd December rematch, that had been previously scheduled. Fighting in front of 10,119 in attenance, Jermain Taylor repeatedly drilled Kassim Ouma with vicious shots that included numerous uppercuts that repeatedly jolted the undersized Kassim Ouma. Nevertheless, Kassim Ouma never backed off his attack against Jermain Taylor. Jermain Taylor suffered a deep cut in the corner of his left eyelid from an accidental clash of heads in the 5th round, and despite blood periodically flowing for much of the bout, Jermain Taylor continued to hammer away and score the win by unanimous decision.

On 19 May, 2007, Jermain Taylor fought Cory Spinks in Memphis, Tennessee. Jermain Taylor won by split decision over Cory Spinks to retain his title.

On 29 September, 2007, Jermain Taylor fought undefeated Caucasian Kelly Pavlik in Atlantic City. Jermain Taylor dropped Kelly Pavlik in round 2 and came close to scoring a stoppage, yet Kelly Pavlik bravely made it through the round and was able to get back into the fight. Coming into round 7 Jermain Taylor was leading on all 3judge’s scorecards but lost his title to Kelly Pavlik when the referee stopped the fight after Jermain Taylor was suddenly knocked out late in the round. In post-match interview, Jermain Taylor said “I thought I was losing so I wasted a lot of energy trying to finish him off”, indicating an agreement with Kelly Pavlik who also thought he was winning on the judges’ scorecards. For the fight against Kelly Pavlik, Jermain Taylor was trained by Manny Steward.

There was a rematch clause in the contract of the Pavlik-Taylor fight, if Jermain Taylor lost. An above-middleweight rematch took place on 16 February, 2008 in Las Vegas with Jermain Taylor losing by unanimous decision.

Jermain Taylor will fight Jeff Lacy on 15 November in a WBC super middleweight eliminator on HBO.

Jermain Taylor is known to be a huge fan of the University of Arkansas Razorbacks. Jermain Taylor gained immense popularity in the state for frequently mentioning how proud he was to be from Arkansas, and has visited the Arkansas campus to talk to various sporting teams. Jermain Taylor now sports a large Razorback on the back of his boxing robe, and “ARKANSAS” is spelled out prominently on his boxing trunks.

Jermain Taylor is married to former Louisiana Tech and former WNBA player Erica Taylor. Jermain Taylor is a graduate of McClellan Magnet High School, Class of 1997.

Jermain Taylor was also a playable boxing character in the video game Fight Night Round 3.

Jermain Taylor struggles with stuttering, mainly when he gets nervous, such as when doing numerous interviews as a boxing champion.

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Speech Differences And Stutter Series-Disabled Legend Tiger Woods

Eldrick Tont “Tiger” Woods was born on 30 December, 1975 in Cypress, California, USA. Tiger Woods is an American professional golfer whose achievements to date rank him among the most successful golfers of all time. Currently the World No. 1, he was the highest-paid professional athlete in 2007, having earned an estimated $122,000,000 from winnings and endorsements. According to Golf Digest, Tiger Woods made $769,440,709 from 1996 to 2007, and the magazine predicts that by 2010, Tiger Woods will become the world’s 1st athlete to pass $1,000,000,0000 in earnings.

Tiger Woods has won 14 professional major golf championships, the 2nd highest of any male player, and 65 PGA Tour events, 3rd all time. Tiger Woods has more career major wins and career PGA Tour wins than any other active golfer. Tiger Woods is the youngest player to achieve the career Grand Slam, and the youngest and fastest to win 50 tournaments on tour.

Tiger Woods has held the number 1 position in the world rankings for the most consecutive weeks and for the greatest total number of weeks. Tiger Woods has been awarded PGA Player of the Year a record 9 times, the Byron Nelson Award for lowest adjusted scoring average a record 8 times, and has tied Jack Nicklaus’ record of leading the money list in 8 different seasons. Tiger Woods has been named Associated Press Male Athlete of the Year a record-tying 4 times, and is the only person to be named Sports Illustrated’s Sportsman of the Year more than once.

Tiger Woods, who is multiracial, is credited with prompting a major surge of interest in the game of golf. Tiger Woods dramatically increased attendance and TV ratings and generated interest among a multicultural audience in a game that used to be considered insular and elitist.

After winning the 2008 U.S. Open, Tiger Woods is sitting out the rest of the 2008 PGA Tour, missing 2 major championships and the 2008 Ryder Cup, in order to concentrate on the rehabilitation of his injured left knee.

Tiger Woods was born to Earl (1932-2006) and Kultida (Tida) Woods. Tiger Woods is the only child of their marriage but has 2 half-brothers, Earl Jr. (born 1955) and Kevin (born 1957), and 1 half-sister, Royce (born 1958) from the 18-year marriage of Earl Woods and his 1st wife, Barbara Woods Gray. Earl, a retired United States Army lieutenant colonel and Vietnam War veteran, was of mixed African American(50%), Chinese (25%)and Native American (25%) ancestry. Kultida (nee Punsawad), originally from Thailand, is of mixed Thai (50%), Chinese (25%), and Dutch (25%) ancestry. This makes Tiger Woods himself 1/4 Chinese, 1/4 Thai, 1/4 African American, 1/8 Native American, and 1/8 Dutch. Tiger Woods refers to his ethnic make-up as “Cablinasian” (a portmanteau he coined from Caucasian, Black, (American) Indian, and Asian).

At birth, Tiger Woods was given “Eldrick” and “Tont” as 1st and middle names, respectively. Tiger Woods’ middle name, Tont, is a traditional Thai name. Tiger Woods got his nickname from a Vietnamese soldier friend of his father, Vuong Dang Phong, to whom his father had also given the “Tiger” nickname. Tiger Woods became generally known by that name and by the time he had achieved national prominence in junior and amateur golf, he was simply known as “Tiger” Woods. Tiger Woods grew up in Orange County, California, USA and graduated from Western High School in Anaheim in 1994.

Tiger Woods is a Buddhist. Tiger Woods has said that his faith was acquired from his mother and that it helps control both his stubbornness and impatience.

In November 2003, Tiger Woods became engaged to Elin Nordegren, a Swedish model. They were introduced during The Open Championship in 2001 by Swedish golfer Jesper Parnevik, who had employed her as an au pair. They married on 5 October, 2004 at the Sandy Lane resort on the Caribbean island of Barbados and live at Isleworth, a community in Windermere, a suburb of Orlando, Florida, USA. They also have homes in Jackson, Wyoming, California, USA and Sweden. In January 2006, they purchased a $39,000,000 residential property in Jupiter Island, Florida, USA which they intend to make their primary residence. Their Jupiter Island neighbours will include fellow golfers Gary Player, Greg Norman and Nick Price, as well as singers Celine Dion and Alan Jackson. In 2007, a guest house on the Jupiter Island estate was destroyed in a fire caused by lightning.

Early in the morning of 18 June, 2007, Elin gave birth to the couple’s 1st child, a daughter, Sam Alexis Woods, in Orlando. The birth occurred just 1 day after Tiger Woods finished tied for 2nd in the 2007 U.S. Open. Tiger Woods chose to name his daughter Sam because his father said that Tiger Woods looked more like a Sam. On 2 September, 2008, Tiger Woods announced on his website that he and his wife are expecting their 2nd child.

Tiger Woods was a child prodigy who began to play golf at the age of 2. In 1978, he putted against comedian Bob Hope in a television appearance on The Mike Douglas Show. At age 3, he shot a 48 over 9 holes at the Navy Golf Club in Cypress, California, USA and at age 5, he appeared in Golf Digest and on ABC’s That’s Incredible. In 1984 at the age of 8 he won the 9–10 boys’ event, the youngest age group available, at the Junior World Golf Championships. Tiger Woods went on to win the Junior World Championships 6 times, including 4 consecutive wins from 1988 to 1991.

While attending Western High School in Anaheim at the age of 15, Tiger Woods became the youngest ever U.S. Junior Amateur Champion, was voted Southern California Amateur Player of the Year for the 2nd consecutive year, and Golf Digest Junior Amateur Player of the Year 1991. Tiger Woods successfully defended his title at the U.S. Junior Amateur Championship, becoming the 1st multiple winner, competed in his 1st PGA Tour event, the Nissan Los Angeles Open and was named Golf Digest Amateur Player of the Year, Golf World Player of the Year and Golfweek National Amateur of the Year in 1992.

The following year, Tiger Woods won his 3rd consecutive U.S. Junior Amateur Championship, and remains the event’s youngest-ever and only multiple winner. In 1994, he became the youngest ever winner of the U.S. Amateur Championship, a record that stood until 2008 when it was broken by Danny Lee. Tiger Woods was a member of the American team at the 1994 Eisenhower Trophy World Amateur Golf Team Championships and 1995 Walker Cup. Later that year, he enrolled at Stanford University, and won his 1st collegiate event, the William Tucker Invitational. Tiger Woods declared a major in Economics and was nicknamed “Urkel” by his college teammates. In 1995, he defended his U.S. Amateur title, and was voted Pac-10 Player of the Year, NCAA First Team All-American, and Stanford’s Male Freshman of the Year (an award that encompasses all sports). Tiger Woods participated in his 1st PGA Tour major, the Masters Tournament, and tied for 41st as the only amateur to make the cut. At age 20 in 1996, he became the 1st golfer to win 3 consecutive U.S. Amateur titles and won the NCAA individual golf championship. In winning the Silver Medal as leading amateur at The Open Championship, he tied the record for an amateur aggregate score of 281. Tiger Woods left college after 2 years and turned professional.

With the announcement, “Hello World,” Tiger Woods became a professional golfer in August 1996, and signed endorsement deals worth $40,000,000 from Nike, Inc. and $20,000,000 from Titleist. Tiger Woods played his 1st round of professional golf at the Greater Milwaukee Open, tying for 60th place, but went on to win 2 events in the next 3 months to qualify for the Tour Championship. For his efforts, Tiger Woods was named Sports Illustrated’s 1996 Sportsman of the Year and PGA Tour Rookie of the Year. Tiger Woods began his tradition of wearing a red shirt during the final round of tournaments, a link to his college days at Stanford and a colour he believes symbolizes aggression and assertiveness.

The following April, Tiger Woods won his 1st major, The Masters, by a record margin of 12 strokes, becoming the youngest Masters winner and the 1st winner of African-American or Asian-American descent. Tiger Woods set a total of 20 Masters records and tied 6 others. Tiger Woods won another 3 PGA Tour events that year, and on 15 June, 1997, in only his 42nd week as a professional, rose to number 1 in the Official World Golf Rankings, the fastest-ever ascent to world No. 1. Tiger Woods was named PGA Player of the Year, the 1st golfer to win the award the year following his rookie season.

While expectations for Tiger Woods were high, his form faded in the 2nd half of 1997, and in 1998 he only won 1 PGA Tour event. Tiger Woods answered critics of his “slump” and what seemed to be wavering form by maintaining he was undergoing extensive swing changes with his coach, Butch Harmon, and was hoping to do better in the future.

In June 1999, Tiger Woods won the Memorial Tournament, a victory that marked the beginning of one of the greatest sustained periods of dominance in the history of men’s golf. Tiger Woods completed his 1999 campaign by winning his last 4 starts, including the PGA Championship, and finished the season with 8 wins — a feat not achieved in the past 25 years. Tiger Woods was voted PGA Tour Player of the Year and Associated Press Male Athlete of the Year for the 2nd time in 3 years.

Tiger Woods started 2000 with his 5th consecutive victory and began a record-setting season, where he would win 3 consecutive majors, 9 PGA Tour events, and set or tie 27Tour records. Tiger Woods went on to capture his 6th consecutive victory at the AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am with a comeback for the ages. Trailing by 7 strokes with 7 holes to play, he finished eagle-birdie-par-birdie for a 64 and a 2-stroke victory. Tiger Woods’ 6 consecutive wins were the most since Ben Hogan in 1948 and only 5 behind Byron Nelson’s record of 11 in a row. In the 2000 U.S. Open, he broke or tied a total of 9 U.S. Open records with his 15-shot win, including Old Tom Morris’s record for the largest victory margin ever in a major championship, which had stood since 1862, and became the Tour’s all-time career money leader. Tiger Woods led by a record 10 strokes going into the final round, and Sports Illustrated called it “the greatest performance in golf history.” In the 2000 Open Championship at St Andrews, which he won by 8 strokes, he set the record for lowest score to par (−19) in any major tournament, and he holds at least a share of that record in all 4 major championships. At 24, he became the youngest golfer to achieve the Career Grand Slam.

Tiger Woods’ major championship streak was seriously threatened at the 2000 PGA Championship, however, when Bob May went head-to-head with Tiger Woods on Sunday at Valhalla Golf Club. Tiger Woods played the last 12 holes of regulation 7 under par, and won a 3-hole playoff with a birdie on the 1st hole and pars on the next 2. Tiger Woods joined Ben Hogan (1953) as the only other player to win 3 professional majors in 1 season. 3 weeks later, he won his 3rd straight start on Tour at the Bell Canadian Open, becoming only the 2nd man after Lee Trevino in 1971 to win the Triple Crown of Golf (U.S., British, and Canadian Opens) in 1 year. Of the 20 events he entered in 2000, he finished in the top 3, 14 times. Tiger Woods’ adjusted scoring average of 67.79 and his actual scoring average of 68.17 were the lowest in PGA Tour history, besting his own record of 68.43 in 1999 and Byron Nelson’s average of 68.33 in 1945, respectively. Tiger Woods was named the 2000 Sports Illustrated Sportsman of the Year, becoming the 1st(and only) athlete to be honoured twice. Tiger Woods was ranked as the 12th best golfer of all time by Golf Digest magazine just 4 years after he turned professional.

Tiger Woods’ 2001 Masters Tournament win marked the only time within the era of the modern Grand Slam that any player has been the holder of all four major championship titles at the same time, a feat now known as the “Tiger Slam.” It is not viewed as a true Grand Slam, however, because it was not achieved in a calendar year. Surprisingly, he was not a factor in the 3 remaining majors of the year, but finished with the most PGA Tour wins in the season, with 5. In 2002, he started off strong, joining Nick Faldo (1989-90) and Jack Nicklaus (1965-66) as the only men to have won back-to-back Masters Tournaments.

2 months later, Tiger Woods was the only player under par at the U.S. Open, and resurrected buzz about the calendar Grand Slam, which had eluded him in 2000. All eyes were on Tiger Woods at the Open Championship, but his 3rd round score of 81 ended Grand Slam hopes. At the PGA Championship, he nearly repeated his 2000 feat of winning 3 majors in 1 year, but bogeys at the 13th and 14th holes in the final round cost him the championship by 1 stroke. Nonetheless, he took home the money title, Vardon Trophy, and Player of the Year honours for the 4th year in a row.

The next phase of Tiger Woods’s career saw him remain among the top competitors on the tour, but lose his dominating edge. Tiger Woods did not win a major in 2003 or 2004, falling to 2nd in the PGA Tour money list in 2003 and 4th in 2004. In September 2004, his record streak of 264 consecutive weeks as the world’s top-ranked golfer came to an end at the Deutsche Bank Championship, when Vijay Singh won and overtook Tiger Woods in the Official World Golf Rankings.

Many commentators were puzzled by Tiger Woods’s “slump,” offering explanations that ranged from his rift with swing coach Butch Harmon to his marriage. At the same time, he let it be known that he was again working on changes to his swing, this time in hopes of reducing the wear and tear on his surgically-repaired left knee, which was subjected to severe stress in the 1998-2003 version of his swing. Again, he anticipated that once the adjustments were complete, he would return to his previous form.

In the 2005 season, Tiger Woods quickly returned to his winning ways. Tiger Woods won the Buick Invitational in January and in March he outplayed Phil Mickelson to win the Ford Championship at Doral and temporarily return to the Official World Golf Rankings number 1 position (Vijay Singh displaced him once again 2 weeks later). In April, he finally broke his “drought” in the majors by winning the 2005 Masters Tournament in a playoff, which regained him the number 1 spot in the World Rankings. Vijay Singh and Tiger Woods swapped the number 1 position several times over the next couple of months, but by early July, Tiger Woods had established an advantage, propelled further by a victory at the 2005 Open Championship, a win that gave him his 10th major. Tiger Woods went on to win 6 official money events on the PGA Tour in 2005, topping the money list for the 6th time in his career. Tiger Woods’ 2005 wins also included 2 at the World Golf Championships.

For Tiger Woods, the year 2006 was markedly different from 2005. While he began just as dominantly (winning the 1st 2 tournaments he entered on the year) and was in the hunt for his 5th Masters championship in April, he never mounted a Sunday charge to defend his title, allowing Phil Mickelson to claim the green jacket.

On 3 May, 2006, Tiger Woods’s father/mentor/inspiration, Earl, died after a lengthy battle with prostate cancer. Tiger Woods took a 9-week hiatus from the PGA Tour to be with his family. When he returned for the 2006 U.S. Open, the rust was evident — he missed the cut at Winged Foot, the 1st time he had missed the cut at a major as a professional, and ended his record-tying streak of 39 consecutive cuts made at majors. A tie for 2nd at the Western Open just 3 weeks later showed him poised to defend his Open crown at Hoylake.

At the 2006 Open Championship, Tiger Woods staged a tour de force in course management, putting, and accuracy with irons. Using almost exclusively long irons off the tee (he hit driver only one time the entire week — the 16th hole of the 1st round), he missed just 4 fairways all week (hitting the fairway 92% of the time), and his score of −18 to par (3 eagles, 19 birdies, 43 pars, and 7 bogeys) was just 1off of his major championship record −19, set at St Andrews in 2000. The victory was an emotional one for Tiger Woods, who dedicated his play to his father’s memory.

4 weeks later, at the 2006 PGA Championship, Tiger Woods again won in dominating fashion — making only 3 bogeys, tying the record for fewest in a major. Tiger Woods finished the tournament at 18-under-par, equaling the to-par record in the PGA that he shares with Bob May. In August 2006, he won his 50th professional tournament at the Buick Open, and at the age of 30 years and 7 months, became the youngest golfer to do so. Tiger Woods ended the year by winning 6 consecutive PGA Tour events, and won the 3 most prestigious awards given by the PGA Tour (Jack Nicklaus, Arnold Palmer, and Byron Nelson Awards) in the same year for a record 7th time.

At the close of his 1st 11 seasons, Tiger Woods’s 54 wins and 12 major wins had surpassed the all time 11-season PGA Tour total win record of 51 (set by Byron Nelson) and total majors record of 11 (set by Jack Nicklaus). Tiger Woods was named Associated Press Male Athlete of the Year for a record-tying 4th time.

Tiger Woods and tennis star Roger Federer, who share a major sponsor, first met at the 2006 U.S. Open tennis final. Since then, they have attended each other’s events and have voiced their mutual appreciation for each other’s talents.

Tiger Woods began 2007 with a 2-stroke victory at the Buick Invitational for his 3rd straight win at the event and his 7th consecutive win on the PGA Tour. The victory marked the 5th time he has won his 1st tournament of the season. With this win, he became the 3rd man (after Jack Nicklaus and Sam Snead) to win at least 5 times in 3 different events on the PGA Tour (his 2 other events are the WGC-Bridgestone Invitational and WGC-CA Championship). Tiger Woods earned his 2nd victory of the year at the WGC-CA Championship for his 3rd consecutive and 6th win overall at the event. With this victory, he became the 1st player to have 3 consecutive victories in 5 different events.

At the 2007 Masters Tournament, Tiger Woods was in the final group on the last day of a major for the 13th time in his career, but unlike the previous 12 occasions, he was unable to win. Tiger Woods finished tied for 2nd 2 strokes behind winner Zach Johnson.

Tiger Woods earned his 3rd victory of the season by 2 strokes at the Wachovia Championship, the 24th different PGA Tour tournament he has won. Tiger Woods has collected at least 3 wins in a season 9 times in his 12-year career. At the U.S. Open, he was in the final group for the 4th consecutive major championship, but began the day 2 strokes back and finished tied for 2nd once again. Tiger Woods’ dubious streak of never having come from behind to win on the final day of a major continued.

In search of a record-tying 3rd consecutive Open Championship, Tiger Woods fell out of contention with a 2nd-round 75, and never mounted a charge over the weekend. Although his putting was solid (he sank a 90-footer in the 1st round), his iron play held him back. “I wasn’t hitting the ball as close as I needed to all week,” he said, after he finished tied for 12th, 5 strokes off the pace.

In early August, Tiger Woods won his record 14th World Golf Championships event at the WGC-Bridgestone Invitational by 8 strokes for his 3rd consecutive and 6th victory overall at the event. Tiger Woods became the 1st golfer to win the same event 3 straight times on 2 different occasions (1999-2001) and (2005-2007). The following week, he won his 2nd straight PGA Championship by defeating Woody Austin by 2 strokes. Tiger Woods became the 1st golfer to win the PGA Championship in back-to-back seasons on 2 different occasions: 1999-2000 and 2006-2007. Tiger Woods became the 2nd golfer, after Sam Snead, to have won at least 5 events on the PGA Tour in 8 different seasons.

Tiger Woods earned his 60th PGA Tour victory at the BMW Championship by shooting a course record 63 in the final round to win by 2 strokes. Tiger Woods sank a 50-foot putt in the final round and missed only 2 fairways on the weekend. Tiger Woods led the field in most birdies for the tournament, and ranked in the top 5 in driving accuracy, driving distance, putts per round, putts per green, and greens in regulation. Tiger Woods finished his 2007 season with a runaway victory at the Tour Championship to capture his 4th title in his last 5 starts of the year. Tiger Woods became the only 2-time winner of the event, and the champion of the inaugural FedEx Cup. In his 16 starts on Tour in 2007, his adjusted scoring average was 67.79, matching his own record set in 2000. Tiger Woods’s substantial leads over the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th players were similar in 2000 (1.46 (Phil Mickelson), 1.52 (Ernie Els), 1.66 (David Duval)) and 2007 (1.50 (Els), 1.51 (Justin Rose), 1.60 (Steve Stricker)).

Tiger Woods started the 2008 season with an 8-stroke victory at the Buick Invitational. The win marked his 62nd PGA Tour victory, tying him with Arnold Palmer for 4th on the all time list. This marked his 6th victory at the event, the 6th time he has begun the PGA Tour season with a victory, and his 3rd PGA Tour win in a row. The following week, he was trailing by 4 strokes going into the final round of the Dubai Desert Classic, but made 6 birdies on the back 9 for a dramatic 1-stroke victory. Tiger Woods took home his 15th World Golf Championships event at the Accenture Match Play Championship with a record-breaking 8 & 7 victory in the final.

In his next event, the Arnold Palmer Invitational, Tiger Woods got off to a slow start, finishing the 1st round at even par and tied for 34th place. After finishing the 3rd round in a 5-way tie for 1st place, he completed his 5th consecutive PGA Tour victory with a dramatic 24-foot putt on the 18th hole to defeat Bart Bryant by a stroke. It was also his 5th career victory in this event. Geoff Ogilvy stopped Tiger Woods’s run at the WGC-CA Championship, a tournament Tiger Woods had won in each of the previous 3 years. Tiger Woods remains the only golfer to have had more than 1 streak of at least 5 straight wins on the PGA Tour.

Despite bold predictions that Tiger Woods might again challenge for the Grand Slam, he would never mount a serious charge at the 2008 Masters Tournament, struggling with his putter through each round. Tiger Woods would still finish alone in 2nd, 3strokes behind the champion, Trevor Immelman. On 15 April, 2008, he underwent his 3rd left knee arthroscopic surgery in Park City, Utah, and missed 2 months on the PGA Tour. The 1st surgery he had was in 1994 when he had a benign tumor removed and the 2nd in December 2002. Tiger Woods was named Men’s Fitness’s Fittest Athlete in the June/July 2008 issue.

Tiger Woods returned for the 2008 U.S. Open in one of the most anticipated golfing groupings in history between him, Phil Mickelson and Adam Scott, the top 3 golfers in the world. tiger Woods struggled the 1st day on the course, notching a double bogey on his 1st hole. Tiger Woods would end the round at +1 (72), 4 shots off the lead. Tiger Woods scored -3 (68) his 2nd day, still paired with Mickelson, managing 5birdies, 1 eagle and 4 bogeys. On the 3rd day of the tournament, he started off with a double bogey once again and was trailing by 5 shots with 6 holes to play. However, he finished the round by making 2 eagle putts, a combined 100 feet(30 m) in length, and a chip-in birdie to take a 1 shot lead into the final round. Tiger Woods’s final putt assured that he would be in the final group for the 6th time in the last 8 major championships.

On Sunday, 15 June, Tiger Woods began the day with another double bogey, and trailed Rocco Mediate by 1 stroke after 71 holes. Tiger Woods winced after several of his tee shots, and sometimes made an effort to keep weight off of his left foot. Tiger Woods was behind by 1 stroke when he reached the final hole. Left with a 12-foot putt for birdie, he made the shot to force an 18-hole playoff with Mediate on Monday. Despite leading by as many as 3 strokes at one point in the playoff, Tiger Woods again dropped back and needed to birdie the 18th to force sudden death with Mediate, and did so. Tiger Woods made par on the 1st sudden death hole; Mediate subsequently missed his par putt, giving Tiger Woods his 14th major championship. After the tournament, Mediate said “This guy does things that are just not normal by any stretch of the imagination,” and Kenny Perry added, “he beat everybody on 1 leg.”

2 days after winning the U.S. Open, Tiger Woods announced that he would be required to undergo reconstructive anterior cruciate ligament(ACL)surgery on his left knee and would miss the remainder of the 2008 golf season including the final 2 major championships: The Open Championship, and the PGA Championship. Tiger Woods also revealed that he had been playing for at least 10 months with a torn ligament in his left knee, and sustained a double stress fracture in his left tibia while rehabbing after the surgery he had after the Masters. Publications throughout the world asserted his U.S. Open victory as “epic” and praised his efforts especially after learning of the extent of his knee injury. Tiger Woods called it “My greatest ever championship – the best of the 14 because of all the things that have gone on over the past week.”

When Tiger Woods 1st joined the professional tour in 1996, his long drives had a large impact on the world of golf. However, when he did not upgrade his equipment in the following years (insisting upon the use of True Temper Dynamic Gold steel-shafted clubs and smaller steel clubheads that promoted accuracy over distance), many opponents caught up to him. Phil Mickelson even made a joke in 2003 about Tiger Woods using “inferior equipment” (meaning outdated technology), which did not sit well with either Nike, Titleist or Tiger Woods. During 2004, Tiger Woods finally upgraded his driver technology to a larger clubhead and graphite shaft, which, coupled with his prodigious clubhead speed, made him one of the Tour’s lengthier players off the tee once again.

Despite his power advantage, Tiger Woods has always focused on developing an excellent all-around game. Although in recent years he has typically been near the bottom of the Tour rankings in driving accuracy, his iron play is generally accurate, his recovery and bunker play is very strong, and his putting (especially under pressure) is possibly his greatest asset. Tiger Woods is largely responsible for a shift to higher standards of athleticism amongst professional golfers, and is known for putting in more hours of practice than most.

Early in his professional career, Tiger Woods worked almost exclusively with leading swing coach Butch Harmon, with whom he started in 1993, but since March 2004, he has been coached by Hank Haney. In June 2004, Tiger Woods was involved in a media spat with Butch Harmon, who works as a golf broadcaster, when Butch Harmon suggested that he was in “denial” about the problems in his game, but they publicly patched up their differences.

While Tiger Woods is considered one of the most charismatic figures in golfing history, his approach is, at its core, cautious. Tiger Woods aims for consistency. Although he is better than any other Tour player when he is in top form, his dominance comes not from regularly posting extremely low rounds, but instead from avoiding bad rounds. Tiger Woods plays fewer tournaments than most professionals (15–21 per year, compared to the typical 25–30), and focuses his efforts on preparing for (and peaking at) the majors and the most prestigious of the other tournaments. Tiger Woods’s manner off of the course is cautious as well, as he carries himself in interviews and public appearances with a carefully controlled demeanor reminiscent of the corporate athlete persona developed between Nike and Michael Jordan.

As of June 2008, Tiger Woods has won 65 official PGA Tour events, an additional 22 individual professional titles, owns 2 team titles in the 2-man World Golf Championships-World Cup, and won the inaugural FedEx Cup playoffs. Tiger Woods has successfully defended a title 21 times on the PGA Tour, has finished runner-up 24 times, 3rd place 17 times, and has won 29% (65 out of 222) of his professional starts on the PGA Tour. Tiger Woods has hit a combined total 18 holes-in-1 in the course of his lifetime — his 1st at the age of 6. Tiger Woods has a 31-6 record when leading after 36 holes in Tour events, and a 44–3 record when leading after 54 holes. Tiger Woods is 14-0 when going into the final round of a major with at least a share of the lead, and he has never lost any tournament when leading by more than 1shot after 54 holes. Tiger Woods has been heralded as “the greatest closer in history” by multiple golf experts. Tiger Woods owns the lowest career scoring average and the most career earnings of any player in PGA Tour history.

Tiger Woods has been the PGA Player of the Year a record 9 times, the PGA Tour Money Leader a record-tying 8 times (with Jack Nicklaus), the Vardon Trophy winner a record 7 times, and the recipient of the Byron Nelson Award a record 8 times. Tiger Woods has spent over 9 years atop the world rankings in his 12-year career. Tiger Woods is 1 of 5 players (along with Gene Sarazen, Ben Hogan, Jack Nicklaus, and Gary Player) to have won all 4 professional major championships in his career, known as the Career Grand Slam, and was the youngest to do so. Bobby Jones won all 4 of what were in his era considered major championships. Tiger Woods is the only player to have won all 4 professional major championships in a row, accomplishing the feat in the 2000-2001 seasons. Tiger Woods’s win at the 2005 Open Championship made him only the 2nd golfer (after Nicklaus) to have won all 4 majors more than once. With his win in the 2008 U.S. Open, Tiger Woods joins Nicklaus as the only golfers to win each major at least 3 times. Tiger Woods holds at least a share of the scoring record in relation to par in all 4 majors, and also holds the margin of victory record in 2 majors, The Masters and the U.S. Open.

At the 2003 Tour Championship, Tiger Woods set the all-time record for most consecutive cuts, starting in 1998, with 114 (passing Byron Nelson’s previous record of 113)and extended this mark to 142 before it ended on 13 May, 2005 at the EDS Byron Nelson Championship. Many consider this to be one of the most remarkable golf accomplishments of all time, given the margin by which he broke the old record (and against stronger fields in terms of depth than those in Byron Nelson’s day) and given that during the streak, the next longest streak by any other player was usually only in the 10s or 20s. With his victory at the 2006 WGC-American Express Championship, he became the 1st player in PGA Tour history to win at least 8 times in 3 seasons. Tiger Woods’s victory in the Buick Invitational in January 2007 placed him 2nd for the longest PGA Tour win streak at 7 straight, trailing only Byron Nelson’s streak of 11 wins in 1945.

At the 2008 Arnold Palmer Invitational, Tiger Woods became the 1st golfer to win 4 PGA Tour events 5 or more times. In winning the U.S. Open in 2008, he became only the 6th person to win it 3 or more times, the 1st person to win a PGA Tour tournament on the same course 7 times, and the 1st person to win 2 tournaments at the same golf course in the same season.

When Tiger Woods turned pro, Mike “Fluff” Cowan was his caddie until 8 March, 1999. Tiger Woods was replaced by Steve Williams, who has become a close friend of Tiger Woods and is often credited with helping him with key shots and putts.

Unlike the Nike Forged irons available to the public, with the Nike swoosh toward the toe on the topline, these Miura custom forgings have the Nike swoosh stamp centered behind the muscle. Although Miura is acknowledged to have created Tiger Woods’s Titleist-branded irons when they sponsored him, Nike denies that Miura is making any Nike irons and Miura does not comment.

Tiger Woods has used the same exact putter since 1999, and has won 11 of his 12 majors with it. This is the only club in his bag that he’s not paid to use, and has said several times that it gives him a confidence that he’s never had with another putter.

Tiger Woods has established several charitable and youth projects.

The Tiger Woods Foundation was established in 1996 by Tiger Woods and his father Earl. It focuses on projects for children. Initially these comprised golf clinics(aimed especially at disadvantaged children), and a grant programme. Further activities added since then include university scholarships, an association with Target House at St. Jude Hospital in Memphis, Tennessee; the Start Something character development programme, which reached 1,000,000 participants by 2003; and the Tiger Woods Learning Center. The Tiger Woods Foundation recently has teamed up with the PGA Tour to create a new PGA tour event that will take place in the nation’s capital (Washington, D.C.) beginning in July, 2007.

Since 1997, the Tiger Woods Foundation has conducted junior golf clinics across the country. The Foundation began the “In the City” golf clinic programme in 2003. The 1st 3 clinics were held in Indio, California, Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania, and San Juan, Puerto Rico, and were targeted to all youth, ages 7-17, and their families. Each 3-day event features golf lessons on Thursday and Friday of clinic week and a free community festival on Saturday. Host cities invite 15 junior golfers to participate in the annual Tiger Woods Foundation Youth Clinic. This 3-day junior golf event includes tickets to Disney Resorts, a junior golf clinic, and an exhibition by Tiger Woods.

This is a 35,000-square-foot (3,300 m2) educational facility in Anaheim, California which opened in February 2006. It is expected to be used by several thousand students each year in grades 4 to 12. The center features 7 classrooms, extensive multi-media facilities and an outdoor golf teaching area.

Tiger Jam: An annual fundraising concert which has raised over $10,000,000 for the Tiger Woods Foundation. Past performers at Tiger Jam include Sting, Bon Jovi and Stevie Wonder.

Chevron World Challenge: An annual off-season charity golf tournament. The event carries generous prize money, and in 2007 Tiger Woods donated his $1.35,000,000 1st-place check to his Learning Center.

Tiger Woods Foundation National Junior Golf Team: An 18 member team which competes in the annual Junior World Golf Championships.

Tiger Woods has also participated in charity work for his current caddy, Steve Williams. On 24 April, 2006 Tiger Woods won an auto racing event that benefited the Steve Williams Foundation to raise funds to provide sporting careers for disadvantaged youth.

Tiger Woods has written a golf instruction column for Golf Digest magazine since 1997and in 2001 wrote a best-selling golf instruction book, How I Play Golf, which had the largest print run of any golf book for its 1st edition, 1.5,000,000 copies.

Tiger Woods announced on 3 December, 2006 that he will develop his 1st golf course in the United Arab Emirates through his golf course design company, Tiger Woods Design. The Tiger Woods Dubai will feature a 7,700-yard (7,000 m), par-72 course named Al Ruwaya (meaning “serenity”), a 60,000-square-foot (6,000 m2) clubhouse, a golf academy, 320 exclusive villas and a boutique hotel with 80 suites. Tiger Woods Dubai is a joint venture between Tiger Woods and Tatweer, a member of the government-affiliated Dubai Holding. Tiger Woods chose Dubai because he was excited about the “challenge of transforming a desert terrain into a world-class golf course.” The development is scheduled to be finished in late 2009 at Dubailand, the region’s largest tourism and leisure project.

On 14 August, 2007, Tiger Woods announced his 1st course to be designed in the U.S., The Cliffs at High Carolina. The private course will sit at about 4,000 feet (1,200 m)in the Blue Ridge Mountains near Asheville, North Carolina, USA.

Tiger Woods has been called the world’s most marketable athlete; shortly after his 21st birthday in 1996, he began signing numerous endorsement deals with companies including General Motors, Titleist, General Mills, American Express, Accenture and Nike, Inc.. In 2000, he signed a 5-year, $105,000,000 contract extension with Nike. It was the largest endorsing deal ever signed by an athlete at that time.

Tiger Woods’s endorsement has been credited in playing a significant role in taking the Nike Golf brand from a “start-up” golf company earlier in the past decade, to becoming the leading golf apparel company in the world and a major player in the equipment and golf ball market. Nike Golf is one of the fastest growing brands in the sport, with an estimated $600,000,000 in sales. Tiger Woods has been described as the “ultimate endorser” for Nike Golf, frequently seen wearing Nike gear during tournaments and even in advertisements for other products. Tiger Woods receives a cut from the sales of Nike Golf apparel, footwear, golf equipment and golf balls and has a building named after him at Nike’s headquarters campus in Beaverton, Oregon.

In 2002, Tiger Woods was involved in every aspect of the launch of Buick’s Rendezvous SUV. A company spokesman stated that Buick is happy with the value of Tiger Wood’s endorsement, pointing out that more than 130,000 Rendezvous vehicles were sold in 2002 and 2003. “That exceeded our forecasts,” he was quoted as saying. “It has to be in recognition of Tiger.” In February 2004, Buick renewed Tiger Woods’s endorsement contract for another 5 years, in a deal reportedly worth $40,000,000.

Tiger Woods collaborated closely with TAG Heuer to develop the world’s 1st professional golf watch, released in April 2005. The lightweight, titanium-construction watch, designed to be worn while playing the game, incorporates numerous innovative design features to accommodate golf play. It is capable of absorbing up to 5,000 Gs of shock, far in excess of the forces generated by a normal golf swing. In 2006, the TAG Heuer Professional Golf Watch won the prestigious if product design award in the Leisure/Lifestyle category.

Tiger Woods also endorses the Tiger Woods PGA Tour series of video games; he has done so from 1999 up to 2007 and it is likely that he will continue to do so.

In February 2007, along with Roger Federer and Thierry Henry, Tiger Woods became an ambassador for the “Gillette Champions” marketing campaign. Gillette did not disclose financial terms, though an expert estimated the deal could total between $10,000,000 and $20,000,000.

In October 2007, Gatorade announced that Tiger Woods will have his own brand of sports drink starting in March 2008. “Gatorade Tiger” marks his 1st U.S. deal with a beverage company and his 1st licensing agreement. Although no figures were officially disclosed, Golfweek magazine reported that it was for 5 years and could pay him as much as $100,000,000.

On 20 August, 2006, California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger and First Lady Maria Shriver announced that Tiger Woods would be inducted into the California Hall of Fame. Tiger Woods was inducted on 5 December, 2007 at The California Museum for History, Women and the Arts in Sacramento.

In both Nelson’s and Tiger Woods’s eras, “making the cut” has been defined as receiving a paycheck. However, in Nelson’s day, only players who placed in the top 20 in an event won a paycheck whereas in Tiger Woods’s day only players who reach a low enough score within the 1st 36 holes win a paycheck. Several golf analysts argue that Tiger Woods did not actually surpass Nelson’s consecutive cuts mark, reasoning that 31 of the tournaments in which Tiger Woods competed were “no-cut” events, meaning all the players in the field were guaranteed to compete throughout the entire event regardless of their scores through 36 holes (and hence all “made the cut,” meaning that they all received a paycheck). These analysts argue that this would leave Tiger Woods’s final consecutive cuts made at 111, and Nelson’s at 113.

However, at least 10 of the tournaments in which Nelson played did not have modern-day cuts; that is, all of the players in these events were guaranteed to compete past 36 holes. The Masters, for example, did not institute a 36-hole cut until 1957 (which was well after Nelson retired), the PGA Championship was match play until 1958 and it is unclear whether or not 3 other events in which Nelson competed had 36-hole cuts. Therefore, these analysts remove “no 36-hole cut” events from both cut streak measures, leaving Nelson’s consecutive cuts made at 103 (or possibly less) and Tiger Woods’s at 111.

In the tournaments in which Nelson competed that did not have 36-hole cuts (that is: the Masters, PGA Championship and the possible 3 other tournaments), only the top 20 players received a paycheck even though all players in these events were guaranteed to compete past 36 holes. Hence, in these no-cut events, Nelson still placed in the top 20, so Nelson’s 113 cuts made are reflective of his 113 top 20 finishes. Tiger Woods achieved a top 20 finish 21 consecutive times (from July 2000 to July 2001) and, in the 31 no-cut events in which he played, he won 10 and finished out of the top 10 only 5 times. Others, including Tiger Woods himself, argue that the 2 streaks cannot be compared, because the variation of tournament structures in the 2 eras is too great for any meaningful comparison to be made.

Early in Tiger Woods’s career, a small number of golf experts expressed concern about his impact on the competitiveness of the game and the public appeal of professional golf. Sportswriter Bill Lyon of Knight-Ridder asked in a column, “Isn’t Tiger Woods actually bad for golf?” (though Bill Lyon ultimately concluded that he was not). At first, some pundits feared that Tiger Woods would drive the spirit of competition out of the game of golf by making existing courses obsolete and relegating opponents to simply competing for second place each week.

A related effect was measured by economist Jennifer Brown of the University of California, Berkeley who found that other golfers played worse when competing against Tiger Woods than when he was not in the tournament. The scores of highly skilled (exempt) golfers are nearly one stroke higher when playing against Tiger Woods. This effect was larger when he was on winning streaks and disappeared during his well-publicized slump in 2003-04. Jennifer Brown explains the results by noting that competitors of similar skill can hope to win by increasing their level of effort, but that, when facing a “superstar” competitor, extra exertion doesn’t significantly raise one’s level of winning while increasing risk of injury or exhaustion, leading to reduced effort.

Many courses in the PGA Tour rotation (including Major Championship sites like Augusta National)began to add yardage to their tees in an effort to slow down long hitters like Tiger Woods, a strategy that became known as “Tiger-Proofing”. Tiger Woods himself welcomed the change as he believes adding yardage to the course does not affect his ability to win.

Tiger Woods’s performance in the Ryder Cup playing for the American team has been mediocre throughout the years. In his 1st Ryder Cup in 1997, he earned only 1½ points competing in every match and partnering mostly with Mark O’Meara. Costantino Rocca defeated Tiger Woods in his singles match. In 1999, he earned 2 points over every match with a variety of partners. In 2002, he lost both Friday matches, but, partnered with Davis Love III for both of Saturday’s matches, won 2 points for the Americans, and was slated to anchor the Americans for the singles matches, both squads going into Sunday with 8 points. However, after the Europeans took an early lead, his match with Jesper Parnevik was rendered unimportant and they halved the match. In 2004, he was paired with Phil Mickelson on Friday but lost both matches, and only earned 1 point on Saturday. With the Americans facing a 5-11 deficit, he won the 1st singles match, but the team was not able to rally. In 2006, he was paired with Jim Furyk for all of the pairs matches, but they only won 1 point. Tiger Woods won his singles match, 1 of only 3 Americans to do so that day. Tiger Woods is 3-1-1 in singles matches but has a much worse record in the team matches, which has led critics to question his partnership abilities. By comparison, in the Presidents Cup, Tiger Woods is 3-2 in singles matches and 10-10 in partnership matches.

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Schizophrenia Series-Disabled Legend Andrew Goram

Andrew Lewis Goram was born on 13 April, 1964 in Bury, Lancashire, England. Andrew Goram is a former professional footballer who played as a goalkeeper. Andrew Goram currently works for Clyde as a goalkeeping coach. Andrew Goram started his career with Oldham Athletic and Hibernian, but he is best remembered for playing for Rangers during the 1990s, when he earned the monicker “The Goalie”. In 2001 he was voted Rangers’ greatest ever goalkeeper by the Rangers fans. After his time with Rangers he played for many clubs, most notably at Motherwell and a brief loan spell at Manchester United. Andrew Goram also represented Scotland at cricket, but was banned from playing that sport after moving to Rangers.

Andrew Goram joined Oldham Athletic as a teenager and spent 7 years with the English club, winning his 1st Scotland caps and selection for the 1986 World Cup. In 1987, he moved to Hibernian, where his father had also been a goalkeeper, for a fee of £325,000. Andrew Goram was a great success at Hibs and achieved the remarkable feat of scoring a goal in a Premier Division match, against Morton.

Andrew Goram was sold to Rangers in 1991 for £1,000,000 and went on to help the club to win 6 of their 9 Scottish League titles in a row between 1989 and 1997. Andrew Goram was also involved in Rangers’ notable run in the European Cup in 1992-93, as they came within 1 point of reaching the final.

Andrew Goram was also an important player for the Scotland national team, winning 43 caps. Andrew Goram had a long-running rivalry with Jim Leighton for the goalkeeping position in the Scotland team. Craig Brown controversially selected Andrew Goram ahead of Jim Leighton for Scotland’s matches in Euro 96, despite the fact that Jim Leighton had played in most of the qualifiers. Craig Brown then selected Jim Leighton for France 98, which prompted Andrew Goram to walk out of the squad completely.

After it was reported in the press that Andrew Goram had a mild form of schizophrenia, fans responded with a chorus of “Two Andy Gorams, there’s only 2 Andy Gorams”. This chant quickly gained popularity, and became the title of a book documenting humorous football chants.

While playing for Dumfries club Queen of the South in 2002, he won the Scottish Challenge Cup. This made Andrew Goram the 1st player to collect a full set of winners medals from the 4 senior Scottish football competitions.

Andrew Goram is now an after-dinner speaker and regularly attends Rangers’ fan gatherings. Andrew Goram has also worked as a goalkeeping coach, joining Airdrie United in March 2006 and then Clyde in February 2008.

Also a cricketer, Andrew Goram represented the Scottish cricket team 4 times: twice (1989 and 1991) in the annual first-class game against Ireland and twice (again in 1989 and 1991) in the NatWest Trophy.

A left-handed batsman and right-arm medium-pace bowler, he never achieved any great success, and his most significant act was probably to bowl England Test player Richard Blakey in a NatWest Trophy game against Yorkshire in 1989.

Andrew Goram was also a league cricketer, appearing as a wicket-keeper and batsman for various Oldham clubs in the Saddleworth League including Delph & Dobcross, Moorside and also East Lancashire Paper Mill in Radcliffe, Bury.

Recently Andy Goram has been making a cricketing comeback. Andrew Goram has played for the Freuchie Cricket Team and their most recent match was against the Sussex Ladies.

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